What You See In This Photo Reveals How Creative And Innovative You Are

Photo: mom.me
What You See In This Photo Reveals How Creative And Innovative You Are
Entertainment And News

The latest in the what-do-see images to go viral has been around for over a hundred years. The cartoon was originally published in Harper's Weekly (Nov. 19, 1892), but was based on an even earlier illustration in Fliegende Blätter, a German humor magazine (Oct. 23, 1892).

However, it was American psychologist Joseph Jastrow who used this optical illusion to show that perception isn't just a result of the act of seeing, but that it also has to do with mental activity.

If the participant could see both images and switch between them easily, Jastrow theorized that it indicated a person's creative abilities and how much faster their brain works.

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During testing, those subjects who were able to see both images were able to come up with five different and/or unusual uses for an everyday item. But those who had trouble switching between the two could only think of two unusual uses for the same item. 

Once you're able to see both, it's impossible to not switch between them. You never look at it the one way again.

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Oddly, when children are tested at different times of the year, the results vary. During Easter, kids are more likely to see the image as a rabbit and when they're tested on random time in October, they see it as a duck.

It's probably the simplest test you can take that will confirm what a creative and innovative genius you truly are.

RELATED: 11 Things All Highly Creative People Have In Common

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Christine Schoenwald is a writer, performer, and astrology lover. She has written over 500 articles on the zodiac signs and how the stars influence us. She's had articles in The Los Angeles Times, Salon, and Woman's Day. 
Editor's Note: This article was originally posted on March 11, 2016 and was updated with the latest information.