Trust Me, You Don’t Want Bigger Boobs

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woman in bikini
Self

I have had a D cup since high school, and it became a part of my identity to be “Savannah with the big ****.”

It’s no secret that having larger breasts is romanticized.

I’ve heard plenty of women say they want “At least a C cup.” But having larger breasts comes with its own repercussions. Although one might yearn to have a larger cup size, I’m here to explain how big boobs attract lewd sexual comments and a surplus of attention from all social dynamics.

Ultimately, having large breasts means the world treats you differently, and it’s not always in a respectful, pleasant manner.

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Big Breasts Come With a Big Audience

Displaying your breasts is a sure way to garner attention, but when you’re “top-heavy”, this brings a lot of unwarranted attention since a big rack is hard to ignore.

Imagine going about your day at the grocery store, laundromat, school, or job, and more often than not receiving some kind of glare or comment.

People will stare. People stare so much it becomes uncomfortable to walk outside in a top or dress that reveals any cleavage.

The unsolicited attention will influence how you dress, convincing you to hide your breasts and conceal them with tight sports bras and discreet shirts. For this reason, when it comes to clothes, there will always be a thought in the back of your head: “Will these clothes fit, how will they fit, and do I feel comfortable with how my breasts will look if I wear this in public?”

For years now I’ve deliberately worn clothes that minimize my bust in order to avoid indecent attention from strangers and even people I know.

As social outings become uncomfortable when you have large breasts, imagine talking to people. Finding and wearing clothes you’re comfortable in is hard enough without the added contextual layer of, “I’m going to see a certain person today and I don’t want this person to notice my chest or stare.”

It’s disappointing when you’re talking to a friend and during a conversation, you notice micro-glances toward your chest. Yes, this happens to many women regardless of their cup size.

But even just one micro-glance is enough to make you self-conscious. Personally, when someone starts looking at my chest, I feel unsafe, and it brings genuine distress because of the real prospect of awkward sexual undertones during an exchange.

Big Boobs Also Make Being Part of a Family Awkward

Aside from social dynamics, family dynamics also become potentially heartbreaking, uncomfortable, and awkward. Sometimes boobs are an invitation for another female family member to touch them in awe since big breasts come off as a wondrous oddity of some sort. The male relatives in your family may call you “beautiful” because of your measurements. They may give you certain suggestive looks.

Sometimes, having large breasts feels like a looming secret always following you, waiting to reveal itself in front of everyone else.

This may sound dramatic, and not everything is about body parts in the social world. But we’re talking about an attribute that becomes synonymous with your identification and is impossible to ignore because a large chest is at the forefront of your being.

Big Breasts Make it Harder to Find Genuine Romantic Partners

Breasts play a role in the kind of romantic advances a woman receives. See, when you’re busty, you’re never sure if a romantic partner likes you for who you are, or if this person is mainly interested in what your body has to offer.

It becomes difficult to shift through people’s motivations.

Would this person still want to go out if you were an A or B cup? Everyone has different standards when it comes to attraction, and with some, it may have little to do with bust measurements.

But there’s no denying a large bust does raise the number of potential suitors. The attention that comes with large breasts also follows with an increase in romantic and sexual advances, and a lot will come with impure intentions.

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A lot of the factors that make having large breasts a hassle can also be said of women who have larges hips and butts. No doubt women with big thighs, big butts, and beautiful faces must also receive a lot of attention. It comes with the territory.

When you first see and meet someone, the first things you notice are their face and body. Characteristics such as weight, moles, glasses, hair, and body measurements will always be the most obvious physical traits of a person. The way we look is a huge part of how we identify others and ourselves, whether we like it or not.

Breasts are Important, But Not the Most Important Attribute

Unfortunately, living as a busty woman has made me feel as if my chest is one of the most important qualities people remember me for. People tend to equate my person with my bra size, and it seems to make up a lot of my value in the society I live in. All this must sound like I need to find a new crowd of friends and acquaintances, which might be true to an extent, but this has been my experience thus far.

Breasts are one of the deciding factors in what makes a woman appear like a woman. Breasts are wonderful, naturally-given gifts meant to supply babies with milk.

But if you fantasize about having larger breasts to improve your self-image or to live up to society’s expectations of sex appeal, it’s important to also note the real inadvertent consequences that come with having large breasts.

There’s more to having a big chest than the sexualized portrait we see in everyday life. Big boobs are nice, but in my experience, they've had a negative impact on social and romantic circles and therefore unnecessarily complicate everyday life. Ultimately, there’s so much more to a person than their bra size.

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Savannah M. Rubalcava is a freelance writer at Hollywood Beauty Magazine. Follow her on Twitter

This article was originally published at Medium. Reprinted with permission from the author.