What Is An Enneagram Wing? Everything You Need To Know & Why You Should Care

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Self

The Enneagram is a psychological-spiritual tool that can help you be your best self by helping you to connect with your inner wisdom.

There are nine different personality types and you have all nine points within you. Your type represents the box you get stuck in when you are experiencing stress.

The Enneagram can get you out of your box by getting you in touch with your three centers of intelligence. It helps to peel off all the lies you tell yourself. 

Your Enneagram type can help you to observe yourself in action. It will show you what to look out for, allowing you to know whether you are moving towards stress or integration. The more you work on this, the more presence you will experience.

RELATED: What Your Enneagram Personality Type Reveals About Your Greatest Strengths & Weaknesses

What is an Enneagram wing?

The Enneagram symbol is a Circle. It represents the oneness of the universe and how everything is connected.   

On the circle, you rarely land precisely on one type and this impacts how you show up in the world.

For example, if you are a type six with a five wing, you will take on some of the qualities of type six and type five.

The Enneagram is a complex system based on the movement of energy that never ends.

It represents the complexity of human beings. 

When you meet people who have the same type, you will find that you have much in common. Yet, you will all be different.

Some of the differences coming from your wing.

It is possible to be landing exactly on one type and this is rare. While your type will never change, your wings can change.

If you are stronger on one wing, you can get healthier working on your weaker wing.

Each of the three intelligence centers shows the difference in how each Enneagram wing impacts your personality type.

1. The Belly Center: Type 9, The Peacemaker

Type Nine with a Type Eight (The Challenger) Wing:

You may feel conflicted because Enneagram nines tend to avoid anger while the eight wings emphasize asserting power. 

You are more confident while having passive-aggressive tendencies. You have greater access to your anger, making it easier for you to express your feelings openly in conflict.

Type Nine with a One (The Reformer) Wing:

A nine with one wing has a stronger sense of between right and wrong, helping them focus on achieving their goals. 

You tend to be more introverted and more critical of yourself than others, unlike type nine with an eight wing.  With the influence of wing one, you are more likely to have a hunger for social justice.

RELATED: How To Read The Enneagram Diagram Like A Pro

2. The Heart Center: Type 3, The Achiever

Type Three with a Two (The Helper) Wing:

Enneagram type threes with a two wing excel in being charming and persistent, making them excellent performers and salespeople.

You love the attention from the people around you but can get angry if you do not receive it.

Type Three with a Four (The Individualist) Wing:

The Enneagram three with a four-wing is more likely to have a strong desire to be unique and be the best at what they do because of their competitive nature.

Due to the type three influence, you are more likely to be image-conscious. You can dial back your emotional intensity compared to a type four with a five wing. 

You desire to be different and socially accepted.

3. The Head Center: Type 6, The Investigator

Type Six with a Five (The Investigator) Wing:

An Enneagram type six with a five wing is more likely to be self-controlled and intellectual than a six with a seven wing.

You love to surround yourself with leaders and others who share the same values as you. You need privacy and often are seen as remote and unapproachable because of the five-wing influence.

Type Six with a Seven (The Enthusiast) Wing:

The six with a seven wing can be playful, provocative, and inspiring. You are more outgoing and a risk-taker for a type six, but not as adventurous as a type seven.

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As sixes run by anxiety, you always will have a backup plan if your adventures go wrong.

The best way to begin discerning your Enneagram type and the wing is to become more self-aware by connecting with your three centers of intelligence.

Exploring these centers can give you insight into whom you are meant to be.

Here are suggestions to better connect with your body, heart, and head centers.

1. Body Center

You can learn to feel the sensation of your body by quieting your mind to notice what is going on inside you. 

How are your muscles feeling? Do you feel warm or cold? Are you feeling any discomfort? How relaxed do you feel? Ask the different parts of your body what they have to teach you.

2. Heart Center

You can notice how expansive or closed down you feel in your chest

Does it feel warm or cold? What are you feeling? Are you feeling kindness and compassion? Or are you fearful and closed down?

3. Head Center

Your head center is a transmitter between you and the universe. The more you can quiet your mind, the better you will access the wisdom, giving you great insight into what the Spirit is calling you to do.

Exploring your Enneagram wings can help you to be at your best. 

Even more so, the more healthy you get in all nine Enneagram types will enhance your life, bringing you the joy you never dreamed you could experience.

To benefit from the Enneagram, you need to make this teaching life-long work. You will keep growing in confidence and awareness for the rest of your life.

The more present you become, the greater the flow you will experience in your life. It doesn't mean that life will be easier, but you will struggle less.

RELATED: The 3 Enneagram Instincts & How They Can Transform Your Life

Roland Legge is a Certified Identity Life Coach and a minister in the United Church of Canada in Yorkton, Saskatchewan. You can join his newsletter for free advice and his private Facebook Group called "Discover Your Identity."

This article was originally published at REL Consultants. Reprinted with permission from the author.