Want A Better Relationship? Change The Way You Sleep Together

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happy couple in bed sleeping
Love

Many random things about your life, from your stress levels to your social media use, can have an effect on how you treat your romantic partner, and, ultimately, if your relationship makes it in the long run.

After all, relationships tend to end not just because of one thing, but a combination of many things.

Well, it's time to fix one of those small things by changing the way you sleep with your partner.

Whether it's that you can't sleep when you're in bed together, or you end up having incompatible sleeping positions, learning how to sleep better is the best way to save your relationship in the process.

Are you sleeping in the correct position together? Are you sleeping within the right amount of distance? What should you be wearing to bed?

RELATED: Let Her Sleep In! Why Women Need More Sleep Than Men

We have the answers for you! Here are six ways couples should sleep together for a better relationship, based on studies.

1. Ditch the clothes.

Cotton USA conducted a study where they asked couples what kind of clothing they wear for bedtime, and how satisfied they were with their relationship.

A whopping 57 percent said they go to bed naked and are happier, compared to 48 percent of couples who like comfy pajamas.

Cotton USA believes that the nudist sleepers were happier, since sleeping without clothing leads to more intimacy.

2. Sleep closer together.

If you or your partner like sleeping farther apart because you get overheated easily, it's time to either turn the AC up or get thinner sheets.

A survey conducted at Edinburgh International Science Festival found that out of a 1,000 people, partners who slept less than an inch apart were more likely to be happy with their relationship.

So, couples who have designated sleeping areas in bed may be on to something.

3. Don't be afraid to touch.

"One of the most important differences involved touching. Ninety-four percent of couples who spent the night in contact with one another were happy with their relationship, compared to just 68 percent of those that didn't touch," said Professor Richard Wiseman, the psychologist who led the survey.

Plus, who doesn't get better sleep with a nice touching reminder that the one you love is sleeping next to you?

RELATED: My Seriously Obnoxious Sleep Disorder Almost Ruined My Relationship

4. Get a proper amount of sleep.

You've heard it once and you will hear it a million times. That's because too many people underestimate the power of a full night's sleep.

According to a study published by the University of California Berkeley, a poor night's sleep can lead to conflict within your relationship due to inability to read your partner's emotions and increased negative feelings.

To put it simply, you're going to be cranky, so just go to bed on time.

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5. Don't feel alarmed if you like a certain sleeping position.

Not the type of couple to face the same way while sleeping? That's totally fine.

The study from the University of Hertfordshire found that 42 percent of couples sleep back to back while 31 percent faced in the same direction.

The most important thing is still to be close together and touch.

6. When all else fails, sleep separately.

Just like many other things in life, sleeping better isn't a "one size fits all" situation.

If you both really tried to make sleeping together work, but you or your partner's quality of sleep is suffering, there's nothing wrong with sleeping in different beds.

Toronto's Ryerson University revealed that 30 to 40 percent of couples sleep apart at night. If that means they are getting a good night's sleep so they aren't snapping at each other the next day, it's for the best!

RELATED: 7 Reasons Having Different Bedtimes Brings Couples Closer Together

Nicole Weaver is a senior writer for Showbiz Cheat Sheet whose work has been featured in New York Magazine, Teen Vogue, and more.