7 Easy Ways To Tell If Your Psychic Is The Real Deal (Or A Fraud)

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woman at table performing psychic reading
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Are psychics real? To get to the point, yes. How do I know? Because I am one. But I do know that there are fakes out there.

It’s really embarrassing to openly admit that even though I’m a psychic, I have been a victim of a psychic con artist. I was in such a vulnerable place, unable to tap into my own intuition, wanting to reconnect with my family, in excruciating mental pain, and needing that outside guidance for relief. 

Because of that awful experience, I’m above and beyond compassionately angry at those "psychics" and "mediums" who cheat, lie, and prey on your emotional discomfort.

So how do you know a psychic is real?

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I have to protect and warn women that there are way more frauds and shills out there than there are authentic, healing ones. They will, without a doubt or care in the world, prey on your weak mental state and scam you in order to make a buck. 

Since I know what it’s like to fall into trap of a psychic fraud, this is for you — the strong, intelligent, warm-hearted, well-intentioned woman who is in a temporary life dip, right now.

But first, let's cover the basics.

Who are psychics and what do they do?

A psychic is someone who uses their senses to perform acts or reveal information. A popular misconception is that psychics can speak to the dead, which is not true. They can only hear, feel, and see information coming to them.

There's also a difference between psychics, psychic mediums, clairvoyants, and fortune tellers.

Mediums are empaths who are able to share experiences of spirits from the either side, interacting with spirits just the same as someone on the physical plane. Clairvoyants are able to receive stronger messages from the veil and can see, hear, and feel clearly. Fortune tellers predict someone's future, and may be associated with religious or divine rituals.

Psychics can't facilitate conversations with the dead, but they have the ability to give information about the past, present, or future, and deliver new messages from the other side to the present. 

Psychics aren't born with powers; therefore, they get their psychic powers from years of training and working on intuition, doing so with a positive purpose. Everyone has psychic reading capabilities; however, not everyone can recognize their ability and either ignore them or don't put in the work to develop their power.

You need to connect to that deep, inner part of yourself to find answers to make a decision. Yet, you still seek outside guidance from a stranger who knows nothing about you, but can grant you the validation of thinking or feeling you're on track with your personal journey. 

But how do you avoid fake psychic scams?

As an authentic, healing, well-intentioned psychic, there are some insights and considerations you need to know in order to have that healthy, safe, and beneficial experience and get the guidance or closure you need.

It's even more important in our present times to know when you're being scammed by a psychic, as middle age or older people have been getting scammed as they feel vulnerable and lost during the pandemic. They may turn to a psychic for clarity, and end up losing time and money.

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Here's how to tell if you're getting psychic readings from a con artist.

1. They don't offer a refund.

A real psychic gives a full or partial refund if a connection to the spirit world is not made. And you, the sitter (receiver), will know this typically within 10 or so minutes if the reading isn’t working out for you.

There are many reasons a connection isn’t made and doesn’t mean it can’t ever be made in the future. If this happens, you should be reimbursed for all or part of your money as long as office policies were followed.

A good psychic reader will have boundaries set for themselves, too, in the form of office policies. This is because they are using their time and energy working to provide guidance for you

It’s a fallacy to think that psychic gifts should be given free — they aren’t, because time is still being utilized and spent. What is important is to tell the psychic that the information they are giving you is wrong, if it’s incorrect. 

It’s up to you and is your responsibility to let the psychic know early on in the psychic reading that this setting isn’t working for you, not at the end after your reading. Use your power and take care of yourself. A good psychic will understand and not be offended.

2. It’s 'too' accurate.

Contrary to reality, no psychic or medium is always 100 percent accurate. Psychics are human, so they are prone to misinterpretation and mistranslation of information. Being given too many exact and literal details are signs your info has been researched before your sitting.  

Please know that a good psychic will be able to get specific information and give you details — just not every single piece of information given and not to a point where you are, literally, in disbelief and shock.

The best way to receive a good reading is to take the information given as possible links to or metaphors of the connections being made. That will not diminish the quality of healing you get, and you will be able to understand and get the actual guidance you need.

If you approach your session as a test of your psychic's ability, you will be let down. It’s healthy for you to be skeptical but not cynical.  

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3. There are no references.

A good psychic has testimonials and people who will happily vouch for them and share their experience publicly or privately with anyone who wants to know about their authenticity or validity. 

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If the psychic you have gone to can't provide references, even basic ones, take that as a sign that they aren't the real deal.

4. They tell you that you’ll have to return X amount of times before you get results.

No human can guarantee any amount of sessions will result in a specific outcome. This isn’t cookie-cutter work.

An authentic psychic will prompt you to make your own decisions and empower you to do so. They will not make you dependent on them for answers and won’t continue to take your money.

5. You’re not comfortable.

It's that simple. If your instinct is telling you that you can’t trust them, listen to it! It’s important to believe that feeling you get and not ignore it. Take control, end the session, and get reimbursed.

6. They don't operate from a legit location.

When you're searching for a psychic, make sure they don't operate out of an apartment or home that doesn't look professional or legit. Real psychics may not have signs in the window, but there will be some indication that they work from a pace of business.

A location where you know you'll be scammed is on the street or from a vendor. These "psychics" only want your money and aren't honest readers. 

7. They use scare tactics.

If your psychic is trying to make you fear that something will happen to you if you don't come back, that's a huge red flag. Their success and money circulation come from scaring and discouraging you.

Don't fall into their trap if they make you feel any sense of worry in this way.

Choosing the right psychic is important because your mental state is at stake. Don't be afraid to speak up during your session and do your research before your sitting, because there are folks out there who will take advantage of you emotionally and financially.

Be alert and informed to avoid a psychic scam artist.

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Terrie Huberman is a psychic medium, and intuitive coach and healer based out of Los Angeles, California. Visit her website to learn more and work with her.

This article was originally published at Terrie Huberman. Reprinted with permission from the author.