3 Tips To Safeguard A New Relationship & Make It Last

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Love

If you're wondering about how to make a new relationship last, know that just about every relationship starts with an element of fantasy. In some ways, it has to in order to get off the ground.

Imagination makes things possible but, it can also break your heart.

Everyone knows that relationships can often be dangerous territory, but that risk is rarely enough to stop anyone from pursuing love.

How do you avoid heartache and find a relationship that will last forever? What attracts many of us to the concept in the first place?

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Here are 3 tips on how to make a new relationship last, according to a love expert.

1. Don't get lost in the fantasy.

When you first meet someone you have chemistry with, your head can really start spinning. You begin to imagine a future together.

The chemistry can be so strong that you can almost think of nothing else.

This is normal, and it’s easy to get carried away. But to avoid heartache, it’s important to not get too lost in fantasy and make sure you’re taking the time to get to know someone for who they truly are.

Men tend to start their relationships fast. But you need to take your time and be realistic if you’re going to make it to the finish line.

Relying on fantasy and chemistry can only take you so far — usually three months.

2. Build a friendship.

With all the buildup that comes from having chemistry, you might miss out on whether you actually like this new person you're with.

This is where friendship comes in — it allows you to find your feet.

If the two of you can spend time together doing a variety of things besides having sex, you can begin to establish whether or not you also have a friendship.

You can call it "filling in the other 23 hours." This means that you're comfortable being together morning, noon, and night.

In other words, you're capable of enjoying and spending your days together, and it’s not just a series of intermittent nights.

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3. Treat them like family.

Relationships that last are with those who are considered "part of the family." They could be longtime friends or actual family members.

The introduction of a partner to your family and friends and the introduction to theirs gives a relationship lasting power.

In isolation, the two of you can fall into a hookup. With family, you can become part of a team.

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Family and friends will give you a sense of openness and discovery. As a couple, you're connected by sharing each other with the people who are dearest to you, while also giving you accountability.

Most relationships that last forever are built on a common goal.

When you see yourself, either starting a family or becoming part of a family, the connection helps you to get through the hard times.

Fantasy can get you started but it takes more than that to get you to the finish line.

Let chemistry get you going but let your friendship keep it going.

Friendship is your foundation and with it, you can build anything. Lovers who have the built-in attraction of friendship are capable of long-lasting relationships.

Family and friends are your longest-lasting relationships.

When you make them a part of your life together as a couple, you're creating something with a strong foundation, something that’s built to last.

RELATED: 25 Sure Signs You're Really, Truly — Finally — Ready For A Relationship

James Allen Hanrahan is a highly sought after relationship coach for strong women based in Los Angeles who offers a free Chemistry to Commitment formula for lasting love. If you're a smart woman struggling to achieve relationship success, and tired of dating the wrong guys, connect with him via his calendar link to make finding time easy.

This article was originally published at jamesallenhanrahan.com. Reprinted with permission from the author.