What Your Date’s Coffee Order Says About Their Personality

Photo: Brooke Cagle via Unsplash
First Date Advice For How To Tell Someone's Personality Type By Their Coffee Order
Partner
Love

By Katja Bart

So, you worked up the nerve to invite the person you’ve had your eye on for coffee.

Is the content of their Starbucks order a glimpse into your future together?

RELATED: This Is The Best Time Of Day To Drink Coffee, According To Science

Read on to find out!

Black coffee, plain

If they love black coffee, it screams, “I don’t do frills, I don’t do fuss, and I will drink whatever foul thing you put in front of me so long as it has caffeine in it. Don’t talk to me about bean types. So, what do you do for a living?”

Black coffee with a splash of milk

They read somewhere that sugar was bad for you, but milk wasn’t, so milk is the only way that they sweeten their food anymore.

They won’t have cake to go along with their drink, but they also won’t turn down a good sandwich.

Espresso, single

They’ve definitely been to Italy.

Espresso, double

They clearly have a death wish.

Latte

They have plenty of unthreatening opinions about paper versus plastic.

They also use the phrase “there are always two sides to every story” to the point that you develop a permanent twitch. 

RELATED: 5 Hot & Steamy Coffee Shop Pickup Lines

Flavoured latte

What they’d really like is an old-fashioned milkshake and a banana split.

Since the local coffee shop is sorely lacking in banana splits, they’ll take a mountain of whipped cream and three different flavour shots with a gingerbread cookie crumble for good measure. 

Flat white

They’re a hipster who will be more offended if you take them to a Starbucks than by anything else in the world.

On your date, you might spend more time looking for a coffee shop that meets their high standards than actually sitting down in the coffee shop itself.

Eventually, you will discover that their coffee shop of choice is better than anywhere you frequent.

Your taste buds will be mad at you for the rest of your life. 

Green coffee

They are too much into “woo-woo” stuff.

Also, they read Goop.

“Slimming” coffee

There’s a 110 percent chance that they’re an MLM rep.

They’ll try to lure you in with an “I know we just met, but let me tell you about this amazing work opportunity that will bring you lots of money and change your life.” 

Run for the hills.

Cappuccino

If they order before 10AM, they’re classy.

If they order a cappuccino after 10AM, they’re still classy, but you just know that they’ve been reading stereotyping articles on the Internet before your date.

RELATED: Snag Your Dream Guy On Your Coffee Run In 5 Easy Steps!

Frappuccino

It’s boiling outside.

Subscribe to our newsletter.

Join now for YourTango's trending articles, top expert advice and personal horoscopes delivered straight to your inbox each morning.

Also, they just wanted a milkshake.

Coffee shaken over ice

They read that sugar is bad for them and they want to make extra sure that the barista doesn’t slip them any unwanted flavoured corn syrup.

That stuff is everywhere, don’t you know?

And don’t even get them started on what GMOs do to your small intestine. 

Tea

They’ve been to England and they want you to know it.

Fancy tea

They’ll probably say, “I just like trying new things and flavours and discovering the world.”

Then, they’ll realize that the stuff tastes like the boiling interior of a fishtank and switch to black coffee really quickly.

No drink at all

Joy in life is for lesser beings.

Also, your “date” will basically interview you from across the table.

Whether they habitually order a flat white or they’re a diehard latte fan, your date’s coffee order says a lot about their personality.

So, next time you’re on a coffee date, make sure your date has good taste – literally.

RELATED: What To Talk About (& What To Avoid) On First Dates

Katja Bart is a writer who focuses on dating, relationships, and love. For more of her dating content, visit her author profile on Unwritten.

This article was originally published at Unwritten. Reprinted with permission from the author.