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Funeral Potatoes Are A Thing — Here's How To Make Them

Photo: Genius Kitchen
what are funeral potatoes

They're not half as somber as they sound.

There’s a reason why some foods have earned the title of being comfort foods. Aside from the obvious comfort factor, these foods warm our whole bodies up and just make us feel good. 

The latest comfort food of the moment is funeral potatoes. Okay, so the name leaves a lot to be desired and might even be a little bit of a turn-off. However, this dish is actually quite delicious and is not half as gloomy as its name suggests. 

Funeral potatoes started trending recently after they popped up on the shelves at Walmart. Many people were stunned by the packaged grub that offered such a bleak name. Although the product sent the Internet into a frenzy, funeral potatoes are far from a new, groundbreaking dish.

So, what are funeral potatoes? And how exactly did they get their name?

Funeral potatoes actually first appeared as far back as the early 1900's when LDS Relief Society cookbooks started including recipes for them. In many parts of the Midwest and the South, especially in Utah and Idaho, funeral potatoes are actually a traditional meal. The potatoes received their name after being served as an after-funeral staple by Mormon Relief Societies and quickly became a Mormon standard. The potatoes are prepared as a cheesy casserole and combined with sour cream, cream soup, and either potato chips or crushed corn flakes to give it some crunch.  The potatoes became symbolic for showing sympathy and providing comfort to those in times of grief.

Fast forward to 2018 and the confusing fascination for the dish has brought it into the limelight. But this meal isn't really all that perplexing if you think about it. It's basically just a potato casserole, which is actually a quite common recipe. It's the name that really has people mystified. And, let's be honest — potato casseroles are one of the best comfort foods you can make. 

And although they're associated with funerals, because that is their name, they don't have to always be made for them. Even those who are already familiar with them will often make them as a comfort food to be eaten whenever they just need a little comfort. So, why not try a funeral potato recipe out for yourself?


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INGREDIENTS

  • 2 lbs hash browns
  • 1⁄2 cup butter
  • 2(10 3/4 ounce) cans condensed cream of chicken soup
  • 1 pint sour cream
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon salt
  • 3⁄4 cup onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 cups longhorn cheese, grated, firmly packed
  • 1 1⁄2 cups corn flakes, crushed
  • 4 tablespoons butter, melted

DIRECTIONS

  1. Saute onion in 1 tablespoon butter until translucent.
  2. Mix all ingredients, except cornflakes and 4 tablespoons butter, together.
  3. Put potato mixture into a 9x13 inch baking pan.
  4. Combine cornflakes and butter, and sprinkle evenly over top of casserole.
  5. Bake at 350 degrees F for 40-50 minutes or until heated and bubbly.
  6. Serve and enjoy while hot!

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Sloane Solomon is a professional writer and editor. She graduated from the University of Colorado with a Bachelors in English Writing. When she's not writing or editing, you can find her daydreaming in French about coffee, online shopping, travel, and baby animals.

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