Dippin’ Dots CEO Scott Fischer Sued For Revenge Porn — After Allegedly Sending Ex-Girlfriend’s Nudes To Her Mom

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Dippin' Dots CEO Scott Fischer

Dippin’ Dots CEO Scott Fischer has been served a lawsuit by his ex-girlfriend who claims that the company head sent her nude images to several people — including her own mother.

Amanda Brown claims the ice-cream empire CEO sent "private sexual images" of her, which he solicited through threats and persuasion, as a form of revenge porn.

She is seeking "punitive damages from Fischer for invasion of privacy, negligence and for intentionally causing her 'severe emotional distress.'"

In response, Fischer’s lawyers have accused Brown of attempting to extort their client.

The former couple has been trapped in a dispute about who should have possession of Fischer’s Chihuahua and car since their February 2020 breakup.

Brown filed the suit against her ex in Oklahoma. In it, she claims that during their two-year relationship he threatened to withhold money from her unless she sent him nude images. She also alleges Fischer tried to use the images to blackmail her after their breakup.

“I just sent you the pics by text that I’m about to send out. You will see what my revenge will do," Fischer allegedly raged to Brown in a text.

Fischer then allegedly sent Brown several sexual images of herself and claimed he had sent them to “everyone.”

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Among the images’ recipients was Brown’s mother, according to the court papers.

“Fischer’s delivery was accompanied by a menacing instruction [to] Amanda’s mother. 'I’m sending this out tomorrow. Then I’m going to file a petition for [the dog],’” the papers say.

Brown also alleges that her ex threatened to post the images on Pornhub and says he had previously used nude images "to gain a thing of value" against other girlfriends.

Fischer is fighting back against the claim, accusing Brown of filing her suit as a cash-grab.

“When Defendant ended the relationship, Plaintiff absconded with a car owned by Defendant, as well as Defendant’s dog, and moved to Tennessee,” Fischer’s lawyers say in legal documents.

Fischer had previously filed a suit against Brown in April demanding she return the dog and car, but says she has been avoiding the claim.

Fischer’s lawyers say that Brown’s team at one point suggested, “that if Defendant did not pay a large amount of money to Plaintiff, they would make the allegations in the Petition public causing Defendant embarrassment which he should want to avoid.”

His team reportedly fought to keep the case sealed in order to avoid the negative publicity associated with, what his lawyers have labeled “unnecessary inflammatory, and hyperbolic allegations.”

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In her suit, Brown claims she has that she has suffered “emotional and verbal abuse" and is seeking unspecified damages.

In Oklahoma, where the lawsuit was filed, it is a felony to "to disseminate without consent the private sexual image of another with the intent to harass, intimidate or coerce the other."

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These laws are still relatively new, Oklahoma’s law was only introduced in 2016, but has responded to a growing need for legislation around sexual harassment online.

However, the language around revenge porn is often a source of debate, notably the requirement of proof that distributing pornography was with “the intent to harass,” or, in other laws “cause distress.”

The distress experienced by revenge porn victims is somewhat inevitable, regardless of the perpetrator’s intent.

One in 25 Americans either threatened with or victims of revenge porn yet victims may be deterred from reporting due to the lack of anonymity.

In many cases, revenge porn is misclassified as an offense rather than a sex crime, giving survivors no right to avoid their names being made public record.

If you are a victim of nonconsensual pornography, also known as “revenge porn”, recorded sexual assault, or sextortion and you reside in the United States, please call the CCRI Crisis Helpline at 1-844-878-CCRI (2274) for information, support, and non-legal advice.

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Alice Kelly is a writer living in Brooklyn, New York. Catch her covering all things social justice, news, and entertainment. Keep up with her on Twitter for more.