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Woman Claims Men Who Make Less Than $50K A Year Are 'Not Ready To Date'

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man from waist down holding cash

Everyone has a mental picture of what their perfect partner will be like. For some, this includes the amount of money that person will make.

However, one woman caused some to raise their eyebrows when she claimed on a podcast that men are “not ready to date” if they make less than $50,000 a year.

A woman said that men who make less than $50,000 a year shouldn’t date.

A recent episode of the "Pour Minds" podcast, hosted by Lex P. and Andrea Nicole, featured Talitha Troupe, who claims to be a “hypergamy dating and business strategist.” Troupe had some controversial thoughts on when a man is ready to date.

“So, if you’re making $50,000, don’t date,” she said. “I’m just being for real. You’re not ready to date.”

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“You’re not ready to date because courtship costs,” she explained. “Everything costs. You can go for 22 walks in the park. Eventually, shorty is going to need a sip of something. She’s going to be thirsty! This bottle of water is $3 in Atlanta.”

Troupe’s comments align with her beliefs and coaching strategy. Merriam-Webster defines hypergamy as “marriage into an equal or higher caste or social group.” This means that Troupe essentially coaches women on how to marry up.

   

   

Troupe continued, “So, if you don’t have any expendable cash, don’t date.”

She did clarify that this can look like different things for different people. For some, $50,000 might be enough. “You might only make $50,000, but you live in a shoe,” she said, “and now you got expendable cash.”

Woman Claims Men Who Make Less Than $50K Are Not Ready To DatePhoto: martin-dm / Canva Pro

Troupe provided one other alternative as well: “Or get you a bottom of the barrel [woman] that’s going to date you when you have no money. And she doesn’t have the expectation.”

A clip from the episode that features Troupe making this point has gone viral on X, with over 26 million views.

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X users couldn’t believe Troupe’s comments.

X users who took the time to reply to the "Pour Minds" podcast’s post did not mince their words. Many attacked and insulted Troupe.

Others simply found her words unbelievable. “It’s 2024 — women have jobs,” one person said. “How are you thirsty and waiting for a man to buy you a drink?”

“This is crazy!” another said. “I’ve been happily married almost 8 years and when me and my wife were first dating each other neither of us made over $50k.”

Woman Claims Men Who Make Less Than $50K Are Not Ready To DatePhoto: Latino Life / Canva Pro

Is Troupe’s advice really financially sound?

According to SoFi, about half of the states in the U.S. do not have an average income over $50,000. Furthermore, as reported on by The Hill, the most recent Census found that “the typical U.S. family earns about $71,000 per year.” In a household with two incomes, that averages out to about $35,500 per person.

The reality is that most people are not making $50,000 a year. By this measure, only an elite few should be able to date according to Troupe.

Troupe’s words force one to consider what is really important in a relationship. Is it money and how much one can offer financially? Or, is it deeper than that? 

   

   

At the end of the day, if you are making enough money to support your lifestyle and have some extra left over, there is no reason you shouldn’t date. There is also no reason to hold yourself to some arbitrary income you must reach before you can consider yourself successful or worthy enough to date.

Money is far from the most important aspect of a relationship.

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Mary-Faith Martinez is a writer for YourTango who covers entertainment, news and human interest topics.