11 Healthy & Educational Ways To Keep Kids Busy While Cooped Up At Home In Coronavirus Quarantine

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11 Healthy & Educational Ways To Keep Kids Busy While Cooped Up At Home In Coronavirus Quarantine
Family, Health And Wellness

With schools shut down for at least the next two weeks to minimize the spread of the coronavirus, parents are faced with the task of entertaining their kids and finding activities to do while in quarantine and isolation.

Maintaining the social distance during a pandemic as recommended by experts can be difficult, especially if you and your kids are used to being out and about. But it doesn't have to be a boring time!

RELATED: Facts About The Coronavirus All Parents Should Know & The Best Ways To Protect Your Kids

Despite so many public facilities shutting down, such as libraries and gyms, there are still many fun kids' activities that can be facilitated at home.

Here are 11 healthy and educational ways to keep your kids busy while they're cooped at home during the coronavirus pandemic.

1. Get outside.

With the weather warming up, taking kids outside for a day hike or bike ride is a wonderful way to help them let off some steam and stay active.

Being in nature improves the mood, makes you feel relaxed, and has a calming effect on the mind.

2. Let kids video chat with their friends.

Suggest they play a game like hangman or Apples to Apples with their friends over video chat.

3. Have them research a topic to present to their siblings or family at the end of the day.

Some topics may include what animals live in the outback or what future space travel may look like. They can also pick a country to research and give a presentation on.

This activity teaches your kids how to use online references and also gives them experience making a presentation.

4. Practice mindfulness with your kids.

Mindfulness is a form of self-care that teaches your kids to focus their attention and awareness on the present moment.

A simple exercise to try is setting a stopwatch for five minutes and just have them be aware of their five senses, such as the feel of their hand on the chair, sounds in the room, or the texture of the couch or their clothes.

Instruct them to be conscious of their own feelings and thoughts without passing judgment — just be and accept.

5. Watch some movies that uplift the spirit.

Here are a few suggestions:

  • "Because of Winn Dixie"
  • "Wonder"
  • "Akeelah and the Bee"
  • "The Waterhorse"
  • "Pay it Forward"
  • "Mary Poppins
  • "The Sound of Music"

RELATED: How To Talk To Your Kids About Coronavirus

6. Use the time to complete cleaning projects around the house.

Whether it’s organizing their closet, donating toys they no longer play with, or organizing their schoolwork, make sure they're doing something productive.

7. Read for pleasure.

Kids often don’t have time to read for fun because of homework.

So, let them pick a book of their choosing and enjoy!

8. Create a happiness collage.

Have your kids find images that they like, as well as inspirational quotes or poems, and glue them on a poster board.

They can use images off of the internet or from magazines.

9. Have kids practice gratitude.

Ask them to think of what good has come out of their time off from school, such as more time together as a family or learning a new skill.

10. Have kids plan and prepare meals every day.

Look up some fun recipes online and have kids prepare a meal with your help from start to finish.

11. Learn a new hobby.

Try knitting, painting, diamond painting, and making lanyards. You can look up instructional videos online.

Make the most out of quarantine and isolation by strengthening your bond as a family. When the crisis is over, your kids will come out stronger than ever.

RELATED: How We Must Reframe 'Social Distancing' To Truly Protect Ourselves & Others During The Coronavirus Pandemic

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Monica Ramunda is a licensed professional counselor and therapist working with individuals, families, children, and teens. For more information, visit her website.​

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