5 Natural Ways To Cope With PTSD

Photo: Nathaniel Flowers via Unsplash
How To Cope With PTSD Naturally For Those Who Don't Feel Comfortable Using PTSD Medication

By Mohit Bansal Chandigarh

PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) is one of the biggest and most serious mental health issues nowadays.

Many people fight with this menace daily and only a few manage to win over it.

That is either because they take the proper medication or they know how to cope with it.

RELATED: 5 Ways People With PTSD Love Differently Than Everyone Else

And for those who don’t know how to, it can prove to be one of the most difficult things in the world.

In most cases, if a person has been in an accident and that is the reason for their PTSD, then it can be very hard for them to drive or even sit in a car again.

Not only does it ruin half of their life experiences, but it also tends to ruin human relationships.

PTSD is something that shouldn’t be taken lightly at all.

It is very important to cope with this problem, otherwise, it might prove to be severe in the future.

While many consult doctors and psychiatrists and cure their PTSD with the help of CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) and medication, some people don’t feel good while doing these things.

Some things that can help these people are the natural ways of coping with this mental health disorder. 

Here are 5 ways that can help you to naturally cope with the menace called PTSD.

1. Meditation

You don’t have to join a yoga class or anything.

You just need to get rid of all the distractions, close your eyes, and meditate for 15 to 20 minutes in a day. That’s it!

Just think about your good place and imagine yourself being there in peace.

Keep doing this for some days and you might just make a habit of it, which is not a bad thing.

Not only will it make you feel positive, but it also tends to help you cope with a lot of mental health disorders.

RELATED: 5 Heartbreaking Signs Your Spouse Is Silently Suffering From PTSD

2. Start exercising

Exercising daily doesn’t only build your physical strength/fitness, it also helps a lot with your mental wellness.

Again, you don’t have to join a gym, if you just go for a 30 minute jog daily, you’ll start to feel that a lot of stress is leaving you.

Just keep doing this to keep your physical and mental health strong.

Also, it’ll help you cope with your PTSD.

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3. Aromatherapy

“Aromatherapy can form part of a healing regime as well as being a preventive therapy in its own right. It gives pleasure through the sense of touch (massage), the sense of smell (aromatic oils), the sense of sight (pleasant surroundings) […] By so doing, it helps to create favorable conditions in body and mind for healing to take place quite naturally.” -David Kinchin, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: The Invisible Injury

RELATED: 9 Ways To Deal With Your PTSD When It Seems Totally Overwhelming

4. Art therapy

It might sound stupid, but indulging yourself in art and craft can actually help you in coping with PTSD and a lot of other mental health disorders.

When you distract your mind from the main reason for stress and focus it on something innovative and creative, you’ll soon notice that you’re not stressing about that thing anymore.

Well, isn’t that just great and simple? Yes, it is.

5. Get a little non-human friend

I am sure you must have heard a lot of people saying ‘pets are awesome’ and you might just agree with them.

Well not only are they a man’s best friend, but they can prove to be a cure for many mental health disorders - especially for those who have no one in their lives and need a companion.

Even doctors and psychiatrists recommend adopting a pet to those who are experiencing serious mental health issues or loneliness.

RELATED: How To Manage PTSD And Reduce Triggers (So You Can Feel Happy Again)

Monit Bansal Chandigarh is a writer who focuses on mental health, self-care, and health and wellness. For more of his mental health content, visit his Twitter page.

This article was originally published at The Mind's Journal. Reprinted with permission from the author.