SPECIALTIES

Communication Problems

Years in Practice

25 years +

where

San Francisco CA 94109 - United States

Credentials

MFT

Additional Expertise

Marriage and Family Therapist, Marriage Coach, Marriage/Couples Counselor, Speaker/Presenter

I Practice in

All areas, please inquire

I AM FLUENT IN

English

I Believe

A loving relationship is a path to developing the best parts of yourself: the love, generosity, kindness, forgiveness, joy, and acceptance. Most of us also know that a close relationship can stimulate other parts: anger, fear, sadness, jealousy. The Path for Couples helps you understand yourself deeply, and to develop your best self.

About George Taylor

George Taylor is a Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, Marin County, CA.

A couples’ counselor, George has taught conscious relationship classes for over 25 years. He is inspired by the love and healing that couples can create by using simple mindfulness and communication tools.

He has taught these powerful tools and practices to thousands of couples at Spirit Rock Meditation Center and throughout the United States. He delights in communicating these teachings in body-based, experiential classes.

George specializes in teaching couples about communication and creativity.

In 2016 he published A Path for Couples: Ten Practices for Love and Joy.

Together, with his wife Debra, George created a model for couples on a path of healing and awakening, and he is committed to enjoying fun, creativity and play. Debra and George have spent 35 years working on their own relationship using practices they have learned from innovative teachers like Steven and Ondrea Levine and Gay and Katie Hendricks.

Please visit A Path For Couples to learn more about George and his practice.

George Taylor Success Stories

In my office a few weeks ago, a couple was struggling because the man wouldn't set a date for the engagement. He kept saying, "I feel numb."more

As a counselor, I know that such numbness is serving a purpose. This man is afraid to say something. After some coaching, he says, "My father was quiet, reserved, and my mother just walked all over him. I didn't go to college because my mother got her way. I don't want to be like him."

Charlie is describing the need for space, for self-development, and he has never learned yet how to both have the room to become himself, and to be intimate with Terry, who is glowering at him.

But when I explain that this is an issue that they can work on, she agrees, "Of course I want him to be himself and to grow in his own way."

As a counselor, I want to move the conversation from his numbness, which Terry interprets as rejection, to a deeper topic: his fear of being like his father. This new conversation opens up an emotional channel between the partners, which leads to connection and love.

George Taylor Articles