What Men And Women Look For In A Mate, According To Evolution

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It's not a cliche — it's evolutionary.

Science shows us once again that the more things change, the more things stay rigidly the same.

No matter your perspective, it always comes down to men having a tendency to look for partners who are younger and more physically attractive, while women look for partners who are older and more financially stable.

I know — this news is stunning. What's more surprising is that these preferences have their roots in evolution.

Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin, studied 4,764 men and 5,389 women from 33 different countries and 37 different cultures. Subjects were given 18 possible characteristics of a mate and were asked to rate those characteristics.

Across the board, both sexes put love, dependable character, emotional stability and pleasing disposition first, and it wasn't until number 5 that men and women differed.

What men look for in women:

  • Looks
  • Physical attractiveness
  • Youth

What women look for in men:

  • Looks 
  • Status
  • Money

In an article in Medical Daily, Daniel Conroy-Beam says, "The large overall difference between men's and women's mate preferences tells us that the sexes must have experienced dramatically different challenges in the mating domain throughout human evolution."

Evolutionary psychology predicts that men and women tend to have consistently different mating strategies because of a simple fact: women get pregnant and men don't.

This incredibly basic asymmetry means men and women face different challenges in regards to reproductive fitness, the number of offspring produced by an individual.

"Because women bear the cost of pregnancy and lactation, they often faced the adaptive problem of acquiring resources to produce and support offspring, while men faced adaptive problems of identifying fertile partners, and sought cues to fertility and future reproductive value," Conroy-Beam said.

In the end, it all boils down to keeping the human race going.

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