How To NOT Get An Erection

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How To NOT Get An Erection
Some men & women still don't realize: both physical & mental stimulation are necessary for erection.

Sex Therapy can be complicated. Fortunately, sometimes it isn’t.

About three months ago my patient Sam finally started dating again after his wife left him last summer. After a few nondescript experiences, he met Yolanda, they hit it off, and a few weeks later he found himself in bed with her. Two days later he came in for his weekly session. Five minutes before it ended, he mentioned how he couldn’t “y’know” when he wanted to “y’know.”

“Oh,” I said. “You didn’t get an erection when you wanted one?” Yes, that was it, poor guy. I knew he wasn’t taking any prescription medication, so I checked that he hadn’t been drinking before the sex. Our time was then up, and I suggested we discuss it the following week.

We did, especially since he had had another “y’know” situation. Sam assumed we’d need to discuss his grief over his wife leaving him, or “maybe my relationship with my mother.”

Instead, I asked him a simple question: “Sam, from what activities were you supposed to get an erection?” He didn’t quite understand the question. “Um,” he said, “we were kissing, and it looked like we might have sex, and I was excited about that. And we were rubbing against each other while making out.”

I told Sam that he needed to have direct stimulation on his penis in order to get an erection. He disagreed; shouldn’t it be enough that he was “excited”? “It’s important that you’re emotionally aroused,” I partially agreed. “But you need to be physically aroused as well.”

He didn’t quite believe me. He didn’t WANT to believe me. Because that would involve communicating with Yolanda: His desire to be touched or licked. How he wanted to be touched or licked. And, of course, the ways he didn’t want to be touched or licked.

Sam was shy about that. Having sex is one thing,” he said. “Talking about it is much more difficult.” I agreed: “Yes, talking about sex is much more intimate than doing it.”

“You know,” I continued, Sex would be a lot easier on the nerves if you didn’t feel pressured to get erect for it. If you just counted everything as sex, and you two decided to enjoy each others’ bodies in whatever ways were available, getting an erection wouldn’t matter.”

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This article was originally published at Sexual Intelligence. Reprinted with permission.
Article contributed by
Advanced Member

Dr. Marty Klein

Author

Dr. Marty Klein is a Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist and Certified Sex Therapist.

In his award-winning books lectures, newsletter, and therapy, he helps men & women understand and accept themselves and their sexuality, reducing their feelings of guilt, shame, anxiety, and isolation.

Dr. Klein's new book is Sexual Intelligence. Psychology Today says, "Read this book if you want to improve your sex life." To connect with Dr. Klein, see his provocative newsletter.

Location: Palo Alto, CA
Credentials: MFT, PhD
Specialties: Couples/Marital Issues, Infidelity / Affair Recovery, Sexuality
Other Articles/News by Dr. Marty Klein:

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