Miscommunication: when what they hear isn't what you said

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Miscommunication: when what they hear isn't what you said
Ever get in an argument,& not sure what you are arguing about? Maybe what you're saying isn't heard?


“I know you believe you understand what you think I said. I'm not sure you realize what you heard is not what I meant.”- Robert McCloskey


It has happened to all of us. We say something, and it is misconstrued or taken out of context and, suddenly, the person hearing it becomes incensed. They respond without thinking about it, and you are left with drama or a big problem. It happens at work, school and home. It happens in our marriages and relationships almost every day. Women talk about what their boyfriend, mother, friends and even strangers say to them all the time. Then they tell their friends and boyfriends and husbands, which keeps the drama growing. Men get in on it too, especially if they are quick to anger. The issue isn’t an issue until someone responds; that’s what fuels the fire and stirs it up until everything is so intensified that no one knows who they are angry at, why they were angry, or why it even mattered in the first place. When I counsel in my office, most of the session is spent clarifying what was said and what was heard. It is often a tedious process, but you cannot understand why you are upset if you no longer know who said what and, more importantly, if they meant what you heard.

 


Miscommunication often happens when we think we know someone very well and begin to assume certain aspects about their personality. This is dangerous, since the only certain truth is that humans are very unpredictable. Husbands and wives that have been married for 25 or more years are still surprised by one another, and teenagers are shocked when they see their mom and dad doing something they had assumed they were too old to ever partake in. Texting, emailing and social networks have heightened the problem. When you communicate electronically, the receiver can assume all sorts of emotions. They can see anger where there are only a few capitals, and they can see excitement with a few exclamation points. Some people always write in caps, and I have a lot of excited people who text me with exclamation points. They cannot all be as excited as they are expressing. Electronic communication also takes away the body language, which is so important when you are trying to convey a feeling.
If you find yourself in the middle of a conflict, before you text, email or post something on your Facebook, it is wise to take a breath and a break. Below are a few other suggestions, which will minimize the damage and diminish the ongoing drama (at least from your end).


1. Remind yourself that feelings are never right or wrong, they just are. If the person writing or texting you is feeling a certain way, there is nothing you will gain by jumping in too quickly because there is no right or wrong.

Article contributed by

Mary Jo Rapini

Counselor/Therapist

For more information go to: www.maryjorapini.com
Talk to me on my fan page: http://www.facebook.com/maryjorapini
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Read my Love and Relationships Blog on Chron.com
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Location: Houston, TX
Credentials: LPC
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