THIS Simple Exercise Can Possibly Save You From A Future Of Diabetes

THIS Simple Exercise Can Possibly Save You From A Future Of Diabetes

THIS Simple Exercise Can Possibly Save You From A Future Of Diabetes

Trade in those heels for a pair of walking shoes.

Would you like a simple strategy to lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes?

As described in an old issue of Diabetes care, researchers evaluated the risk of developing diabetes in a group with low physical activity. After five years of observation, they noted that the group who took fewer than 3,500 steps per day had a 17 percent risk of developing Diabetes; compared to the 12 percent risk for the group who took more than 3,500 steps per day. This study proves that even small amounts of mild exercise can make have a huge impact on your life.

For those who hate to exercise because let's face it, it's not always the most fun, know that: you don't have to do the exercise all at once. It's true when they say the little things count, so try walking around the house during TV commercials, pacing while on the phone, or hitting the stairs instead of the elevator ... these alternatives can possibly lower the risk of diabetes (and other diseases). As you get into the groove, begin adding a little more to your routine, each day — try some fun fitness groups to take the edge off of working out. Eventually, you'll enjoy the high that comes with exercising, as many studies have proven that exercise is a great mood booster. 

This is a lifestyle change that you can't afford to put off another day ... so don't.

Medical Advice Disclaimer: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her health care provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation, or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.


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