Please Don't Put Ground WASP NESTS In Your Vagina — EVER

Photo: Dr. Jen Gunter
Oak Galls used for vagina tightening
Buzz, Self

Apparently some women are in hopes of tightening their vagina.

Historically speaking: Pain is beauty.
 
As a modern woman speaking, understand me when I say, there's certain stuff that just doesn't need to be beautified (read: retouched) or put through the pain. And one of those things is definitely your vagina.
 
Frankly, I'm displeased by the design of genitalia as a whole both vaginas and penises alike. Some women find their vaginas to be beautiful as is, and I'm just not one of them. Even with that said, there are very few things I'm willing to put my vagina through cosmetically when I've just grown to tolerate the good and the bad that comes with the way that my vagina is in its natural state. 
 
I stand by my unwillingness to cosmetically alter my vagina, but some women are seeking out truly bizarre measures in order to tighten their vaginas. And these methods are usually by no means healthy for your genitals, AT ALL. 
 
I mean really, first it was tightening wands and now it's ground wasp nests?
 
What's really going on here? Whatever happened to good ol' fashioned Kegel exercises?
 
 
 
These nests are also known as "Oak Gall" are the product of wasps laying eggs inside a tree's leaf buds. This allows larvae to develop inside, and before they can release their devil-spawn into the world, they are being taken out, ground up, and yes, they're being sold online through retailers such as Etsy, according to the Independent.
 
Sure, a wasp nest is all-natural, especially in comparison to a chemically-charged tightening wand, but what about all the other scary things that might be happening when you put ground up wasps on your VAGINA?! 
 
I've been stung by a bee on the inside of my lip before, and please believe me when I say that's not something you want to experience on your vagina lips ... or worse. (Granted, I'm not sure if that's a real concern or just a figment of my imagination.)
 
Canadian gynecologist Jen Gunter, who wrote about the insanity on her blog, made it clear that this practice "has long-term implications."
 
 
Despite being doubtful that many women would actually purchase this — and this particular Etsy shop removed the product from their page — she continued with her warning, since it's still selling in other retailers online as a "natural" method of tightening your vagina. 

"This product follows the same dangerous pathway of other 'traditional' vaginal practices, meaning tightening and drying the vagina which is both medically and sexually undesirable. Drying the vaginal mucosa increases the risk of abrasions during sex (not good) and destroys the protective mucous layer (not good). It could also wreak havoc with the good bacteria.

In addition to causing pain during sex, it can increase the risk of HIV transmission. This is a dangerous practice with real potential to harm. Here’s a pro-tip, if something burns when you apply it to the vagina, it is generally bad for the vagina."

 
 
 
So, scientifically speaking, you will not only not tighten your vagina, but you will also dry it out, increase chances of tearing, increase the risk of developing HIV, and destroy all the good bacteria that keeps your vagina operating at 100 percent and chases out nasty things like UTIs and yeast infections.
 
Hopefully there aren't many women willing to succumb to these lengths for a tighter vagina, and the people who are trying to sell these snake oil fixes learn quickly enough that it's just a big no-no.
 
You can never be too safe, especially when it comes to your genitals! This product hasn't been scientifically researched in the slightest, which makes it nothing more than a home remedy for insecurity and idiocy. Please do not fall for this!
 
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