Stigmas On Sex: 4 Things You Didn't Know About 'Slut-Shaming'

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slut shame
One thing you didn't know? It has less to do with sexual activity and more to do with social class.

When it comes to our forward-facing society, we've got one thing ass-backwards: our collective view on feminine sexuality.

I have a friend who sleeps around — not too much, not too little — but just enough then when I'm reaching for a word to describe her, the first one I find is "slut." Alternatively, I have a guy friend that also has a penchant for bedding girls he's picked up at the bar on the first night. He is, in everyone's eyes, a conessiour of women. He's a guys' guy. He's the guy who has a healthy sexual appetite — and he's the guy who feeds it regularly.

The gap that exists between our sexes as the way we view sexualityy respective to each isn't even a gap — it's a crater. Thick, ugly and intense. A guy who beds a healthy surplus of broads is "The Man"; a girl who rolls around in the sack with a steady flow of studs is nothing more than a slut — and while we celebrate the guy with a healthy appetite, pat him on the back after his latest conquest, we demean, humilate and shame the girl who does the same. We brand her with the scarlett letter; we make her carry the cross, but the guy? No, we let him kick back with a beer.

But why do we slut-shame with such ease and such frequency? Is it because the manifestation of women who have sex casually, when they want and with whomever they want is in blatant juxtaposition of everything we've been formly told that we don't yet know how to grapple with it? Or is it because it easiest to hate the thing you don't understand?

You'd be surprised, though, to find out just how rampant the nature our of Slut-Shaming culture is — just how deeply it goes, just how vastly it spans. But what's most shocking is that while we ignore it, sending it to the corner so we don't have to look at it, talk about it, watch it from across the dinner table, it grows. It gets bigger and bigger, an all-consuming fog that covers us.

And though we think that we know it all when it comes to women, their wants, their bodies and their sexual partners, here's what we don't know about "sluts" and shaming them.

1. It's Not Just Bystanders Who Are Judging Promiscuous Women. 
Promiscuous women are judging each other, too. This time, it's not just society-at-large that's hammering down on women who are taking in more than one steady partner, it's their own "kind." According to Slate, promiscuous women can't even get a break from themselves. The study asked women to read a vignette about a woman, "Joan", and rate her personality. Researchers found that women classified Joan according to her sexual prowness and from there, deemed her either a "little bit" slutty or a lot slutty.

2. Class Warfare Is Alive And Well  Especially When It Comes To Your Lady Parts.
Researchers from the University of Michigan studied a group of girls that lived together in the same dorm and found that the richer girls deemed their sex-capades as "classy" and rate the other girls on the floor who didn't share their same six-figure lifestyle as "trashy." The research only broadens the rift between the classes that’s already apparent, but this time it also adds a new layer: The richer you are, the classier your romp.

3. Maybe It's The Pill's Fault.
An analysis of the pill, published on Salon, found that even 50 years after its introduction to the market and society as a whole, the narrative that contraception tells has enabled the sexual double standard to stay alive — and well. The writer concludes that slut-shaming just won't "go away" and maybe that's all the pill's fault. One giant step forward to safer sex, one giant leap backwards for female sexuality. 

4. Casual Sex Not Only Makes You A "Slut", It Makes You Less Smart.
Gone are the days when you thought your sexual choices only affected how people viewed your libido — now, who you sleep with, and how often you sleep with them speaks volumes about your intelligence, says science. In a study that attempted to find the link between social stigmas on sex between 18-74 year olds, researchers found that women believed they would be perceived more negatively — and less intelligently — than men would be if they accepted an offer of casual sex.

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