Is Your Guy Kitchen-Shy? How To Turn Him Into A Top Chef

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couple cooking together
How you can help your guy learn to cook, plus two easy-to-make recipes to get him started.

There's no question: These days, cooking is cool, especially for men. Primetime TV is chock-full of sexy, macho men who aren't afraid to tie on an apron, whip up a culinary masterpiece and then, as in the case of Anthony Bourdain, roar off into the sunset on their very manly motorcycles. As London's Daily Mail pointed out in an article last year about the rise of the "gastrosexual," cooking—for our generation of men—has become more of a hobby than a household chore. It's also become a tool for seduction.

With this in mind, I asked some experts for advice on how to turn our men into the cooking beasts they were always meant to be.

 

Expert #1: Rocky Fino

"Cooking is an aphrodisiac," Rocky Fino, author of Will Cook For Sex: A Guy's Guide to Cooking, tells me. "The act alone is an allure to your significant other. Male chivalry is its own attraction."

While the male home chef may be en vogue, there are still men out there who are afraid or simply clueless about how to start cooking, especially if it's for a significant other. But luckily, there are some easy tips and tricks a novice chef can use to get all Gordon Ramsay on his lady in no time, plus there are a few simple steps said lady can take to help her guy meet his culinary goals.

For starters: "Keep it simple," asserts Fino, who strongly advises that couples take baby steps and keep a sense of humor in the kitchen. "Don't try to lay her away with a five-course meal."

Fino says no matter what, remind your guy to have fun: "[Guys should] always wear the apron. It's irresistible to women! Play the role. When all else fails, have your credit card ready. It's time to go out."

Expert #2: Daniel Duane

Daniel Duane, author of How to Cook Like a Man: A Memoir of Cookbook Obsession, says the first thing a woman needs to do is buy her guy a good knife and a large cast-iron skillet.

"Men like tools, and there's nothing like a really beautiful knife," Duane tells me. "We like to feel that we're competent in worldly skills—like being able to change the oil in your car or a bike tire for your girlfriend. There's a version of that in the kitchen." 

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