Guess What? There's A Pro-Birth Control Passage In The Bible

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For many, the birth control debate boils down to religion, but is it really that simple?

In the middle of this heated debate over birth control and religion, it's easy to get the impression that Christians are anti-birth control, and so is God for that matter. Yet, as a mom, a person of faith, a married lady and a birth control lover, I don't see it as so simple. 

The people taking birth control aren't all promiscuous teens. They're women like me, married women who take birth control for family planning reasons, or women like my married friend Nicki, who takes birth control to regulate her severe PMS symptoms. Or even women like the YourTango community member Andrea MacDonald who writes in the comments to an article on the birth control debate, "I'm married and love my husband dearly so of course we are having sex. I'm also 38, my last pregnancy was high risk due to my age, another could be worse."

And the religion thing? Well, it's not so simple either. In an article on the Huffington Post, David Carr, professor of Old Testament studies at Union Theological seminary, writes, "Not many in the current debate realize that the Bible contains a book that celebrates non-reproductive sex and features substances used by ancient women for birth control. The book, Song of Songs (also known as Song of Solomon or Canticles), is a dialogue of love and sexual passion associated with King Solomon. It depicts a woman and a man (it's not clear that the man is Solomon) who desire each other and see each other in secret. Yet, it is not clear that they are married, children are not mentioned as a goal of their love, and their dialogue is laced with mentions of materials that we know were used in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia and/or Greece to prevent pregnancy."

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