How To Help Your Kid Land A Summer Job

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teen waiting tables
Three tips to help your son or daughter find the ideal summer employment opportunity.

Have you sufficiently bored your child with tales of your summer jobs past — peeling potatoes, recycling pop bottles for coins, lifeguard drama or walking bean rows uphill both ways? Probably, but it's only because you know from experience that the benefits of a summer job far outweigh the paycheck anyone receives. With that in mind, her are three ways to help your kid find a great summer job:

1. Beat the crowds. Even before the spring break tee shirts hit the racks, employers are planning their summer resource needs. Be the first on the block to drop in and inquire about possible summer employment, and fill out an application. Dated applications mean you'll be at the front of the line when they start making calls. Have your future wage earner keep a log of all applications so he/she can follow up with each one as the days get warmer.

 

Starting early is also a good reminder to involve the even younger ones in a summer job. There are plenty of options for them — walking the neighbor's dog, odd jobs, pulling weeds and the ever-popular lemonade stand. Instill a strong work ethic when he/she is young and you all will benefit for a lifetime. Wouldn't you rather make the basement into a gym someday than "junior's" apartment?

2. See the future. Young people learn critical lessons at their first jobs, even if they are "just" mowing lawns or washing dishes. Think long-term. You can't really put a price on your child learning the value of responsibility, respect, time allotment, commitment, saving and spending. They'll even learn about taxes! You may hear, "Who's this FICA dude that takes money from all my checks?!"

3. Think outside the box. Get creative with your kids' summer job possibilities. Considering how they view money helps. Your security seeker wants a job with a steady paycheck — dishwasher, housekeeper, nanny. The reliability of the work is an unspoken benefit to him/her. Not knowing when the next babysitting job may pop up doesn't suit his/her money personality.

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This article was originally published at . Reprinted with permission.
Article contributed by

Scott And Bethany Palmer The Money Couple

YourTango Expert Partner

The Money Couple, Scott & Bethany Palmer are parents, finance experts, authors, and regulars on national TV and radio. With 40 years of combined financial planning experience they launched The Money Couple to help couples and families improve their relationships with love and money. Scott and Bethany enjoy an active lifestyle living in Colorado with their two sons, Cole and Cade. Pre-order their NEW BOOK, The 5 Money Conversations To Have With Your Kids At Every Age and Every Stage

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