Breakups And Briefcases: How Your Career Can Lead To Divorce


People with certain careers are more likely to end up in the attorney's office.

There are all kinds of signs you are in a bad relationship, with your unhappiness being the brightest one. But, sometimes these signs have an added wildcard — the profession of you or your spouse.

Your penchant for a certain career may be one of the more subtle signs that you are in a bad relationship for the mere reason that the divorce rate is extraordinarily high in specific professions. In fact, some careers have divorce rates well into the 30 percentile or higher.

The Jobs With the Highest Divorce Rates
A study conducted by Radford University and published in The Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology found that massage therapists, bartenders, those in the entertainment industry, waiters, choreographers, home health aides, telemarketers, and nurses have the highest divorce rates in the US.

Another study published in Business Insider found a similar trend among those who work in the gaming industry (such as blackjack dealers and casino cashiers), while a study involving students at the John Hopkins School of Medicine revealed that surgeons and psychiatrists have the highest divorce rates among medical professionals.

How These Jobs Affect Your Relationship
Your wife being a surgeon at the county hospital or your husband being a craps dealer in Reno, Nevada aren’t sure signs you are in a bad relationship. Some very solid and happy marriages involve those in the above professions, but many couples find themselves struggling for three main reason: time, temptation, and stress

Working as a bartender, in entertainment, as a waiter, etc. often involves sporadic, long hours. Working overnight, or at least well into the night, is also a common occurrence. This can lead to divorce because two people simply never see each other. When they do finally see each other, their work may be the third wheel, at least in the non-literal sense. A psychiatrist, for example, may have a hard time leaving their left-brain back in the office. They may constantly analyze their spouse, pissing them off in the process.

Temptation plays another factor in this, particularly in the areas of entertainment and massage therapy. Entertainment, especially Hollywood, allows people to continually work with some of the prettiest men and women in the world and temptation runs rampant (see Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt). Massage therapy, because it has a sexual element to it, is also a career where hands may roam even when off the clock.

Finally, there is the stress involved in the above careers. Being a surgeon, for example, is exceedingly stressful (If I don’t make this cut right, people could die) and surgeons may take this stress out on those they are closest too. A bartender, on the other hand, might not have a career that involves life or death (If I don’t make this screwdriver with enough alcohol, people could stay sober), but it may be stressful because of the difficult hours, smoky working conditions, and low pay.

Jobs with the Lowest Divorce Rates
On the flipside are the jobs where people are less likely to get divorced. These include media and communication equipment workers, optometrists, agricultural engineers, transit police, clergy, podiatrists, nuclear engineers, and sales engineers. Certain types of medical professions, such as internists, also have a low divorce rate.

This isn’t to say that if you choose these careers you will never ever see signs that you are in a bad relationship; it merely means you are less likely to.

When it comes down to it, it’s not the profession itself that causes people to split from their spouses; rather, it’s the problems those career choices come with. They may come with health plans and 401K’s, but they also come with obstacles. Knowing this going into a marriage can better prepare you for the snags that can arise and help you keep yourself — and your spouse – from being a statistic.

To learn more about signs you may be in a bad relationship, click here.


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