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Is Illness Harming Your Love Life? Don't Let It

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Relationship Coach: Stop Illness From Hurting Your Love Life
Did the announcement of Catherine Zeta Jones' and Michael Douglas' divorce surprise you?
Even if your body is weak from cancer, chronic illness or injury, you can cultivate a strong love.

The news that Catherine Zeta Jones and Michael Douglas are separated and possibly heading toward divorce due to their health challenges (Jones' bipolar disorder and Douglas' cancer) didn't surprise me. When you or your romantic partner become ill or suffer an accident, it's not only your bodies that suffer — your relationship may, too.

In researching my book The Indestructible Relationship, I interviewed dozens of couples who had suffered through illness and trauma. I compared the couples who made it through their hard times to couples who got a divorce after experiencing something traumatic. I found it takes specific skills to keep your relationship alive during illness, injury or any stressful experience.

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It doesn't matter whether you're the one who is injured or ill or you're a caregiver for your spouse or significant other. Either way, it can strain your relationship. Even if you have the world's strongest bond, when you go through something traumatic, life after the incident isn't going to be the same. You're playing by new rules. You're seeing your romantic partner in a whole new light. And some couples are compatible in every way except for the way they handle stress.

In my research for The Indestructible Relationship, strong couples shared with me dozens of skills you can use to keep your relationship strong during times of injury, illness, and stress. Here are five of those skills you'll need if you want to illness-proof and stress-proof your relationship.

1. Go It Alone
Resilient couples know that it's important NOT to sacrifice their social life when their romantic partner is ill. If you're a caregiver for your ill or injured husband or boyfriend and you decide to always stay home to watch over him, you may start to resent him for keeping you away from the activities you love. You might feel guilty for having fun without him. But for the sake of your own mental health, go out with your friends or take a walk in the park. If you want to attend a play or festival but can't find any friends to go with you, attend it alone.

Your romantic partner should be happy you're getting away and taking time for yourself. But if he feels any resentment over the matter or feels bad because you're having fun without him, have him read tip #4 in this article (Seek Support Outside the Relationship). 

2. Become A Human Rubber Band
Let's say deep down inside you've always expected your man to be the primary breadwinner. If your husband is injured or has cancer and can no longer work or take care of you, you may find yourself resenting having to work extra hours to help pay the bills. From the male perspective, a man who weighs his self-worth on his ability to provide for the family will be devastated if an illness prevents him from going to work. He might even resent his wife when she is forced to become the chief breadwinner in the family.

If you want your relationship to survive this role reversal, become a human rubber band by doing things differently. If you always take a left when you leave your house to take a walk, today turn right. Alternate the streets you walk on every day. If Merlot is your usual choice of wine with dinner, tonight try Chardonnay. Do things differently and you'll become more flexible. And flexibility is the key to keeping your relationship alive when things don't go the way you expect.

3. Remember That You Both Own The Illness, Injury, Or Stressful Situation
It's easy when you're sick to feel sorry for yourself. But remember: as your caregiver, your significant other or spouse is also under a lot of stress. It's just as hard on him as it is on you.

In The Indestructible Relationship, I tell the moving story of Wayne, who was paralyzed in a football accident a month after his wedding to Barb. They've been together 40 years now. But if they hadn't solved one of their biggest relationship challenges after Wayne's accident, their story might not have had a happy ending. At first, Wayne didn't notice Barb's feelings, her exhaustion, the fact his accident also burdened her.

The scene usually played itself out like this: the moment Barb sat down, Wayne looked at his wife. "I'm thirsty. I need a glass of water." Sighing, Barb stood up once again, retrieved the water from the kitchen and brought it to her husband. The moment she settled herself into the couch, Wayne presented her with another request.

"I was up and down like a yo-yo," said Barb. It wasn't until Wayne learned to stockpile his requests and present them to her all at one time, that the couple's stress subsided.

4. Seek Support Outside The Relationship
I'm not talking about having an affair. But let's say you have cancer or another chronic illness or you've been injured at work. You try to talk to your husband or boyfriend about what you're going through and he just doesn't understand.

Or if you have breast cancer, maybe he's so afraid of you dying that when you try to talk to him about your own fear of dying, he simply can't go there. Instead of getting frustrated, seek support elsewhere. Talk to a friend. Write in a journal. Join a support group and/or a Facebook group of people who are going through the same thing you are.

5. Re-Adapt When You're Back In The Game
Let's say your husband took over a lot of the child-rearing responsibilities while you were going through chemotherapy and radiation. He helped them with their homework. Picked them up from school. Cooked dinner.

When you heal and are ready to resume your previous involvement in your kids' lives, your husband may not remember how to share the child-rearing responsibility. In some cases, a man in this situation may even resent his wife's attempts to include herself in the established routine and her making decisions about the kids' lives she hasn't been making in months.

To prevent this from happening, you and your husband can follow the human rubber band advice mentioned in tip 2. And allow your hubby to continue to perform some of the child-rearing tasks he took over while you were out of commission—even if these were your responsibilities before the cancer.  

These five ways to illness-proof and injury-proof your relationship are only a start. My research revealed there are dozens more specific skills that resilient couples use to make their lives easier — and their relationships stronger — during difficult times.

But by practicing these five skills when one of you is injured, ill, or even experiencing something stressful like being out of work, there's a better chance that while your body may not be healthy, your relationship definitely will be.

Discover more ways to get the support you need from your romantic partner during cancer, chronic illness, injury and accidents by reading The Indestructible Relationship. The book was named the best non-fiction eBook of 2012 by the Electronic Publishing Industry Coalition (EPIC).

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Article contributed by

Kimberly Pryor Wilkes

Author

Kimberly Pryor

Host of The Rebuilding Your Life After Divorce Mountain Retreat

Author of The Indestructible Relationship

Location: Gardnerville, NV
Credentials: Other
Specialties: Couples/Marital Issues, Dating/Being Single Support, Divorce/Divorce Prevention
Other Articles/News by Kimberly Pryor Wilkes:

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