Want Him To Be Less Of A Sh*tty Husband? Do This. It WORKS.

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Get Your Spouse To Work On Your Marriage

Trust me on this one.

I lose control sometimes. I don't know whether I'm in the minority, or whether most other people lose it, too. I mean, I don't go off the deep end into full-fledged insanity. (I can prove it by showing you all of the non-murder and non-arson I committed following my separation and divorce.) But I do feel emotional swings that probably register on the upper-end of the Emoswingomometer I just invented, but I have no way of knowing how other people experience their feelings.

Sometimes I yell at my son. He's seven and my favorite thing on Earth. And even though I know raising my voice doesn't help him learn lessons — and almost certainly contributes to unhealthy emotional responses  I still do it when I'm super-stressed and he does something that's really, just, seven. There tends to be something really messy or broken to clean up afterward.

I say and think this a lot: Will this matter in five years? No? Then how much does it REALLY matter now? It's a way for me to deal with anxiety or simply to keep life in perspective because everyone has their own hourglass and their story ends when that last bit of sand falls from the Life bulb to the Death bulb, and we tend to not know when that will happen.

We always assume it's some future day so far away that it doesn't matter so we just live life taking it for granted. Even the most grateful person in the world probably takes being alive for granted 98-ish percent of every day.


And that's good. We shouldn't be obsessed with death and freaking out all the time. But I do believe in being mindful of the perfect amount of death.

One of my favorite writers reads The New York Times obituaries every morning in order to be mindful of the opportunity he has been given to be alive. He does it to maintain gratitude and as motivation to not squander it. Another of my favorite writers sometimes walks around imagining that everyone he sees is going to die soon as a reminder to treat them with kindness.

Morbid? A little. Foolish? No way. What if we treated everyone we encounter as if they were going to die tomorrow?


I forget every day to do all of the things I'm supposed to. It's either because I haven't formed good habits, or because it's impossible.

Sometimes I say really mean things to the driver of the car in front of me because they're driving the speed limit. They're literally doing ZERO WRONG THINGS and I call them some creative combination of the worst words I know because I'm in a hurry for something that probably doesn't matter.

Will this matter in five years? Will this matter next week? Will this matter in an hour?

I need to get a grip. But it's hard. I know it's hard for other people, too. Sometimes people lose their sh*t and murder their entire family and then shoot themselves, which seems like an extreme reaction to every possible thing imaginable.

I'm not going to beat myself up about it. The smartest psychologists in the world can't agree on what REALLY happens to our biochemistry regarding emotional reactivity.

Sometimes, I even self-sabotage a little bit like when my mom would ask me how much I'd like being grounded for a week, and I'd respond with something like, "Probably not as much as I'd like two!" And then I'd be grounded for two weeks like an assh*le who deserved it.

It feels good, though, right? To scratch that F*ck You Itch once in a while?

My favorite exchange in the movie Good Will Hunting goes like this:

Will (Matt Damon's character) is attending therapy sessions with Sean (Robin Williams' character). Will is telling Sean about how his alcoholic foster father used to come home drunk looking to beat on his wife and kids.

Will: "He used to just put a belt, a stick, and a wrench on the kitchen table and say, 'Choose.'"

Sean: "Well, I gotta go with the belt there."

Will: "I used to go with the wrench."

Sean: "Why?"

Will: "Because f*ck him. That's why."


Whether we're mad at a co-worker, our children, a business we believe screwed us, or our romantic partners, I think once in a while, all of us choose the wrench.


Sometimes, I'm an assh*le. Ad this isn't fair for me to say because I can't substantiate it but I really do believe it: I'm mostly — like, very mostly — NOT an assh*le.

I care about things. I care about people. It seems like many people go through life completely unconcerned with how their actions affect others. You see it every day. Maybe you're even the person accidentally doing it. I am sometimes.

I wanted to tell you about choosing the wrench and about me sometimes being a dick because, A) It's true, but also, B) I was hoping it would allow me a little leeway to also talk about me being nice without you thinking I was a totally hypocritical, holier-than-thou douchebag.

I think being nice is important. I think not being nice causes a high percentage of life's problems, and exacerbates them close to 100 percent of the time.


Actions speak louder than words. What we do matters more than what we say. Kindness lives in our deeds, not our platitudes. It's why someone can punch his friend in the arm yelling, "You are the biggest dickhead I know!" and it's fun and hilarious because of context, facial expression, and tone of voice. But the EXACT same thing can happen with it being the opposite of fun and hilarious.

But words matter, too. What we say, and HOW we say it. Every conversation is a transaction. What do you want to accomplish?


When the restaurant server or kitchen messes up your order, what is it that you really want to happen next? The waiter or waitress almost certainly didn't intentionally bring you the wrong food. A member of the kitchen staff almost certainly didn't read the order ticket and think, "I know! Let's give this person the wrong meal, so that maybe they'll get mad, want free stuff, yell at us, complain about us on Facebook, and force us to throw food away."

If the restaurant is conspiring against you, you should stop eating there and choose a different dining location. It makes sense to get mad at the front-of-the-house workers or kitchen staff if you can prove they brought you the wrong thing on purpose.

But restaurants only conspire against you when you're an unreasonable prick. So, they brought you the wrong thing and now you have choices:

  • Try to get the meal you ordered and actually want by being nice.
  • Try to get the meal you ordered and actually want by being sh*tty.
  • Verbally abuse the server or restaurant manager because someone made an honest mistake, and you don't care what happens with your food.

This is just one guy's opinion but if you verbally abuse people for one mistake when it's illogical to believe they were trying hurt you, you're a huge assh*le. You are my least-favorite kind of person.

You spend your life purposefully causing conflict and stress and making life harder and sh*ttier for everyone around you. I try hard to figure out what motivates people to do things.

It's always helpful to understand what drives people. Sometimes when you figure it out, it makes sense, and you learn how to see things from a more balanced perspective, and then grow as a person. Sometimes people, with regularity, verbally abuse others when things don't go their way.

I understand they have some kind of unmet psychological need to lash out. But to the rest of the world, it is merely being sh*tty for sh*ttiness' sake. It borders on inexcusable.


If you want to get the meal you ordered but you want to be a dick about it in an effort to let them know you mean business, I submit you're making a poor choice.

"Excuse me, waiter. I know you have the hardest job in the world and everything, but I clearly said I wanted this steak well-done. You see that? Does that look well-done to you?"

"I'm really sorry about that, sir. We'll get that taken care of right away."

"I've got an idea. Don't be sorry. Just listen to what people are saying to you, so that maybe you can get a real adult job someday. Also, when you're finished not screwing up my order, maybe you could bring us another round of drinks."

That's kind of a ridiculous example, but you get it. More often than not, people who witness it will think less of you, you'll feel worse about yourself, and someone in the kitchen will spit in your food or "accidentally" drop it on the floor and laugh about it. And it's a little bit hard to feel sorry for you because you were sh*tty.

If you want to get the meal you ordered, respect yourself, earn the respect of others, and become one of the staff's favorite people who they want to do favors for, give free drinks to, and try hard to deliver your meal fast and spit-free, you should be nice. Smiling helps.

"Hey. I know you're incredibly busy and have too many things to do, and I'm sorry to ask you this but I ordered the pork shoulder and this appears to be a fish of some kind. And, listen, I'm sure the fish is great, but I love that pork dish more than my family. Will you please help?"

"I am really sorry about, sir."

"I promise I'm not mad at you. I understand that neither you nor the kitchen did it on purpose and I appreciate your time and help. I probably should have told you about the pork obsession ahead of time."

"Thank you so much for your patience and understanding. Can I bring you some drinks on the house while you wait?"

Pretty much everyone has experienced a restaurant messing up their order. We had a choice to make about how we were going to handle it.


I can't figure out what the good reason would be to respond with unpleasant words or tones. EVEN IF you have to fake it because you're secretly super-pissed, how does speaking and acting confrontationally improve the situation? How does it get you what you want?

The most frequently asked question I receive is: "How do I get my husband to realize he's being shitty?"

Having never met any of these people, it's really hard to answer that. I'm sure some of those guys are awesome and willing to make their wives feel secure and loved in their marriages. I'm sure there are others who are not. In either case, how can "Ask him very nicely" not be the best answer?

"Hey Manfred. (Because all of them are obviously married to guys named Manfred.) I have a favor to ask you, but I want to explain a little bit. First of all, I love you. I love you and appreciate you for all that you do for me and for all the good things that you are.

Secondly, I want to apologize to you. I'm sorry for anything I've done that might have made you feel unappreciated or as if I was pushing you away. Because this favor I'm going to ask you might come off like I think you're some horrible person, and like I think I'm perfect and amazing. Which of course isn't true. I also want to apologize for not talking about this with you before. I just didn't know how to bring it up.

But listen, this is really important to me. This is our lives. We are not like we used to be. And I know it's easy to shrug our shoulders and think this is just what happens to all married couples. All around us, people are falling apart because they ignore these changes. It seems like no one sees the end coming. It can't happen to us, Manfred.

Sometimes you hurt me. Badly. Sometimes I tell you about it, and we have a fight, and afterward I usually hurt more. But many times — and maybe you do this, too — I don't say anything because I don't want to fight with you, but then it just keeps hurting.

I don't believe you would ever intentionally hurt me. So it's my job to help you understand what causes the pain, and up until now, I've failed to do that. You don't hurt me on purpose, so some of this is on me.

I read something that made sense to me. I don't want to be like: 'Hey, read this thing on the internet and then feel bad about it because you're treating me like crap!' I'm begging you to not take it that way. What I hope you will do is read this stuff in an attempt to understand why I sometimes get upset and you can't figure out why. I know it's frustrating for you when that happens.

Please read this for me, and when you're ready, we can talk about it, because I want to be married to you until we're the oldest, gnarliest couple in the world."


Again, every conversation is a transaction. What is it that you really want to accomplish? There's a time for choosing the wrench. And the other 99-plus percent of the time, there's a time to be nice.

This article was originally published at mustbethistalltoride.com. Reprinted with permission from the author.


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