The 50 Percent Divorce Rate Is Misleading

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The 50 Percent Divorce Rate Is Misleading
Contrary to popular belief, married couples don't have a 50 percent chance of getting divorced.

When it comes to marriage, the news is often doom and gloom these days. Turn on your TV or open the newspaper or your computer, and it's not long before you're reading about another explosive celebrity divorce. Troll the web for some marriage or divorce advice, and you're likely to find a whole lot of theories about why more and more marriages are failing. And certain groups of us who want to marry are having to fight tooth and nail for the right. And how many times have you been reminded that half of all marriages end in divorce? With such depressing news, it's easy to think, what's the point of even walking down that aisle?  Divorce Insurance: Depressing Or Practical?

So you'll probably be just as shocked as we were to hear that, according to the most recent statistics put forth by the CDC on Births, Marriages, Divorces, and Deaths: Provisional Data for 2009, the much-professed 50 percent divorce rate is inflated and outdated. In fact, there were only 3.4 divorces per 1000 people in 2009.

To break it down: there were 3.4 divorces per 1000 people in 2009 and 5.3 marriages per 1000 that same year. It's easy to assume because the number of divorces is about half the number of marriages that the 50 percent divorce rate holds, and that if you marry there's a 50 percent chance you'll divorce, but that'd be an inaccurate impression. These stats don't take into account how many people are already married or how many are on second, third or fifth divorces. Here are some other factors to consider before you go sling the old "half of marriages end in divorce" stat around:

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