How To See A Breakup As A Beginning

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woman wearing red shoes standing on yellow road lines
Author Anna Mitchael explains how to view your breakup as a beginning instead of an end.

The following is an excerpt from Just Don't Call Me Ma'am by Anna Mitchael:

We're all supposed to fear The Breakup Conversation. It makes no difference if you're a regular gal like me or a virtual Venus like Angelina Jolie. When The Breakup Conversation comes up, inevitably someone goes down, and the fear can be paralyzing.

 

Let's say you fall in love with a book in the beginning pages but then you grow more sick of it with every page you turn.

You don't want to give up on the story, because really, you thought you loved it in the beginning, and maybe you can rediscover what interested you at the start. By the end, you are reading into every word, wondering if you can return to the fabulous feeling of the first few chapters.

Single women of marrying and birthing age are supposed to do more than hold on to every word; we're supposed to turn the book upside down, see if studying the letters from a different angle gives a new perspective on how to reignite the passion. Under no circumstances are we supposed to put down the book, let alone walk away without a fight. It only takes a few late night infomercials to remind us that we're not getting any younger, and neither are our breasts.

I know the fear that arrives in the five minutes after The Breakup Conversation. I know walking away from the telephone, or your favorite booth at an Italian restaurant where the two of you always went on Saturday nights, or an email on the computer, as the realization hits you that your life has just changed in a big way. 5 Ways To Enjoy Your Post-Breakup Misery

When you're in the throes of the conversation that ends a relationship, it's difficult to remind yourself that this change is probably for the best. It's much easier to imagine yourself in twenty years with sixty-two cats feeding off a couple cans of tuna fish in your living room, the woman who qualifies for AARP membership yet still gives her mother's name as an emergency contact at the doctor's office.