James Cameron Applauds Ex-Wife Kathryn Bigelow

James Cameron Applauds Ex-Wife Kathryn Bigelow

James Cameron Applauds Ex-Wife Kathryn Bigelow

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Ex-wives everywhere shout hurray at Kathryn Bigelow's Oscar win over James Cameron.

Kathryn Bigelow wears well-earned success well. And her ex-husband, James Cameron, swallows defeat with grace — and (dare we say it) pride. Oscar-Worthy Kisses

She won! He stood. The crowd roared.

The Hurt Locker won six Oscars this year, including Best Director and Best Picture, which, as @kellyoxford said and @ebertchicago retweeted, made "So many ex wives feel good right now." 6 Best Oscar Couples

 

In what was widely touted as The Battle of The Exes A La Hollywood, ex-husband and director of the best selling moving of all time (Avatar) James Cameron, was pitted against ex-wife and director of The Hurt Locker Kathryn Bigelow, for Best Director at 2010's Academy Awards. 7 Hollywood Husband And Wife Oscar Winners

As she stood on stage Sunday evening, clutching a golden Oscar in either hand, one wonders what she truly felt: the glass ceiling, shattered; a romantic rivalry (real or imagined), standing in her honor. Oscar Presenters: Rating Their Chemistry

Below, her ex-husband talking to Charlie Rose about this years Best Director Oscar winner and his ex-wife: James Cameron's Work Obsession Ruined His Marriage

 

Charlie Rose:
What do you make of this competition between you and Kathryn Bigelow? Two very different people who married. But more than that, two people who share this sense of wanting to be good filmmakers.

James Cameron:
Yeah, I think we're really not that different in so many ways, and we know that about each other, that we're both dedicated to the craft. And for both of us, it's very much about the work and about a total, consuming passion for filmmaking. And you know, I think that's what drew us together, is each respected the other's passion and craft and so on, plus she was gorgeous.

Charlie Rose:
Is gorgeous.

James Cameron:
Yeah. You know, but in our minds, it's not a competition. That's a narrative that's imposed by others, because it's, you know, it makes a good story. We're so celebratory of each other's work, and we've remained -- you know, I produced two of her films, one of which I produced -- wrote and produced -- wrote it with Jay Cocks -- after we were divorced. So, we've worked together, and we've been supportive colleagues. She saw "Avatar" five times at different stages of its development, from very crude --

Charlie Rose:
You mean you would go show it to her and say tell me what you think.

James Cameron:
Yeah. She's come over -- and tirelessly come over, watch the film. This is over a period of six or eight months and give me notes and even Mark Boal, who wrote "The Hurt Locker," came and gave me very good notes, very helpful notes. And they had shared Hurt Locker with me earlier on.

Charlie Rose:
Right.

James Cameron:
And my note was very simple. Don't change a damn thing. You know, because they showed it to me fairly late in the process because I had been shooting. And I said, don't change a damn thing. This thing is great. And they were, of course, very nervous --

Charlie Rose:
Why is it so great, do you think?

James Cameron:
I think just because it's consummately good filmmaking -- excuse me, consummately good filmmaking. I mean, you are in those guys' shoes, and you're there. I mean, I have been at screenings and watched people literally sit on the edge of their seat, literally. I mean, you hear that expression all the time. Literally sit forward for the entire movie, hand clinched like this. It's that tight. It's that taught, you know. And for her to -- I mean, she's outgunned the guys, you know, definitely. And of course, her --

Charlie Rose:
You're not surprised by that.

James Cameron:
Not at all, not at all because she's always done that. But it's the recognition, you know, finally the recognition catching up with the scope of her talent.

Charlie Rose:
So if someone sitting there says, look, I'm going to give it to Cameron, best picture but Bigelow best director --

James Cameron:
That would be a fantasy. That would be my fantasy outcome, absolutely.

Charlie Rose:
That would be what you'd like to see?

James Cameron:
That's the best possible outcome because it's -- because I know how hard my team worked and how much they would -- how proud they would be of that accolade, you know what I mean? And look, for myself, I have already got an Oscar. I've got a couple of them, you know. And I respect the whole institution of the Academy Awards because it's so -- it's the pinnacle of achievement in my chosen profession. But I don't really need another one. But to be honored -- you know, to have the team honored and for their accomplishment, that would mean so much to them. And I think that would be the fantasy outcome in all of this.

Charlie Rose:
So you're saying to the voters, please take a look at my team and go for us as best picture. But --

James Cameron:
Yeah, and I --

Charlie Rose:
-- go for Kathryn Bigelow for best director.

James Cameron:
I mean, all I can say is that that would make me very happy if that -- you know, I don't want to try to get --

Charlie Rose:
Happier than if it was best director for James Cameron?

James Cameron:
Honestly, yes.

Charlie Rose:
I believe you.

James Cameron:
Absolutely.

Charlie Rose:
I believe you.

James Cameron:
Absolutely. I mean, I just think she's worked so hard for so long. And there's something very irresistible about the idea of a woman finally being anointed in that role. It's ridiculously long overdue. And she, of course, would reject that being a woman should have anything to do with it.

Photo via Bauer-Griffin.

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