Inside McCain's Marriage

Inside McCain's Marriage

Inside McCain's Marriage

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Inside McCain's Marriage
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A couple through thick and thin: John and Cindy McCain.

JOHN MCCAIN AND CINDY HENSLEY MCCAIN
Married Since: 1980
Family Album: John has a daughter and two sons from his first marriage. John and Cindy have two daughters and two sons together.

He was a war hero, a former prisoner in North Vietnam; she was the daughter of a wealthy beer distributor and almost 20 years his junior. They met in 1979 at a reception in Honolulu. "We both lied about our ages," Cindy told a reporter. "I made myself older and he made himself younger." Before they could marry, he had to divorce his first wife (although they still remain on good terms).

Cindy has always supported her husband's political ambitions; her father reportedly helped bankroll John's first congressional race in 1982. But his first presidential campaign, in 1999, meant revisiting hard times in her life—particularly her addiction to the painkillers Percocet and Vicodin, which she started taking in 1989 after experiencing back pain. She hid her addiction, stealing the drugs from a charity she'd established to provide medical aid to developing countries. Her parents finally confronted her, and she quit "cold turkey" in 1992. No charges were filed, but she repaid the charity as part of a deal with prosecutors. These issues don't seem to have affected most voters' views of her—or him. In fact, Cindy was more often considered a political asset.

Cindy has made medical relief to impoverished countries a major focus of her energy. Her frequent missions produced an unexpected benefit. In 1991, on a visit to Bangladesh, she visited an orphanage where more than a hundred infants were living in poor conditions. At the request of the nuns who ran the orphanage, she brought home one of them, a 10-week-old girl who was severely disfigured by a cleft palate and needed medical care. The McCains gave her that care and eventually adopted her. Now 15, Bridget McCain is currently a high school student in Arizona.

If she became First Lady, Cindy has said that she would make adoption, foster care and health care her issues. She also hopes she could be a role model for people who want to fight drug addiction. "I'm in recovery," she told Newsweek during the last campaign. "If I can do it, then maybe they can too." As First Lady, she would be part Eleanor Roosevelt and part Betty Ford.

Spouses still play a major role in voters' views of the candidates. Electing a First Lady (or a First Husband) is not unlike electing a vice president. The public image of a relationship can make or break a campaign.

To visit the official McCain website, click here.

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Barbara Kantrowitz is a senior writer for Newsweek.

Click On Each Couple To Read More:
HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON AND BILL CLINTON
JOHN EDWARDS AND ELIZABTH ANANIA EDWARDS
RUDY GIULIANI AND JUDITH STICH GIULIANI
MIKE AND JANET HUCKABEE
JOHN MCCAIN AND CINDY HENSLEY MCCAIN
BARACK OBAMA AND MICHELLE ROBINSON OBAMA
RON AND CAROL WELLS PAUL
MITT AND ANN DAVIES ROMNEY

This article was originally published at . Reprinted with permission from the author.
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