5 Reasons Why Loving Your Body is Good for Your Relationship

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5 Reasons Why Loving Your Body is Good for Your Relationship
Make loving you body your top New Year's Resolution!

“Do I look fat in this?”

It’s not just women who ask their partner this no-win question. Plenty of men dislike their bodies joining the virtual epidemic of women who do. It’s almost become the norm to hate your body-- or at the very least, to criticize certain parts.

This negatively spills over onto your relationship.

When you’re habitually critical and insecure about your body it comes through in how you talk, walk, kiss, make love and act. When you ask the classic question, “Do I look fat in this?” or otherwise make it your partner’s job to reassure you that you’re attractive, you put your partner in an impossible situation.

If he or she says, “You look great!” your body hatred won’t let you believe it. You’ve already made up your mind that you don’t look good and whatever your partner says will filter through those beliefs regardless of what he or she thinks. So you might be better off NOT asking that question and, instead, start accepting and loving your body as it is.

If you need more motivation for changing your attitude, here are 5 reasons why loving your body is beneficial for your relationship...

1. You're more fun to be around.
Have you ever been with someone who constantly puts her or himself down and can’t seem to talk about anything else but perceived limitations? It’s a huge downer, isn’t it? When you learn how to accept and love your body, you’ll be more open and accessible to your partner. 

2. You free yourself to actually enjoy your relationship.
It takes a LOT of energy to hate on how you look! When you stop exhausting yourself with criticisms and negative judgments about your body size and appearance, you’ll have a greater capacity to truly enjoy the time you spend with your partner and you may feel more adventurous to try new activities too.

3. You're less distracted.
Instead of focusing so completely on worries that other people (especially your partner) think you’re “fat,” “ugly” or otherwise unattractive, you’ll be able to really listen to the conversations others are trying to have with you. You’ll be able to really engage with your partner instead of being distracted by an onslaught of self-critical thoughts.  

4. You teach your partner how to treat you.
The way you talk about and treat yourself is a powerful example for your partner. The more you make peace with the way you look (and even appreciate it), the more likely your partner will follow along. And, by the way, healthy self-confidence is sexy regardless of what size you wear.

Article contributed by
Advanced Member

Susie & Otto Collins

Author

Susie and Otto Collins are relationship coaches and authors who help couples communicate, connect and create the passionate relationships they desire.



 

Location: Columbus, OH
Credentials: BS, CCC
Specialties: Communication Problems, Couples/Marital Issues
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