More Sex Cements Bonds for Certain Couples

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More Sex Cements Bonds for Certain Couples
Is your partner "tightly-wrapped?" Are you? More sex could be the answer to a closer relationship.

This guest article from Psych Central was written by Rick Nauert.

Experts — and the films of Woody Allen — have documented that neurotic individuals often have more difficulty with relationships and marriage. A new study further suggests the remedy may be lots of sex, at least for newlyweds.

In fact, researchers have determined if neurotic newlyweds have frequent sexual relations, their marital satisfaction is every bit as high as their less neurotic counterparts.

Neuroticism is the tendency to experience negative emotion, and people who are high in it get upset and irritated easily, are moody, and worry frequently. People who score high in neuroticism are less satisfied in romance and relationships, and when they get married they are more likely to divorce.

“High levels of neuroticism are more strongly associated with bad marital outcomes than any other personality factor,” said Michelle Russell and James McNulty, Ph.D., of the University of Tennessee, authors of the study.

But sex in marriage seems to make people happy—other research has shown that sexual interactions improved the next day’s mood. Russell and McNulty wanted to know if frequent sexual activity would erase the negative effects of neuroticism.

They followed 72 newlywed couples over the first four years of their marriage; both spouses reported — separately and privately — on their marital satisfaction and sexual frequency every six months.

On average, couples reported sexual intercourse about once a week during the first six months of marriage, and about 3 times a month by the fourth year of marriage. Couples were considered satisfied when they agreed that they “have a good marriage” and “My relationship with my partner makes me happy.”

Marital satisfaction was not associated with sexual frequency — not at the start of the marriage, or four years later. Highly satisfied marriages sometimes had high levels of sexual activity, and sometimes low levels — sexual contact alone was not a good indicator of marital satisfaction.

But Russell and McNulty found one important exception. For spouses with high levels of neuroticism, frequent sexual intercourse improved their marital satisfaction. The effect of frequent sexual activity was enough to completely wipe away the “happiness deficit” that neurotic spouses usually have.

“Frequent sex is one way that some neurotic people are able to maintain satisfying relationships,” the authors write.

The newlywed period is a time when sexual relations are particularly important, and for some—but not all—frequent sex improves their happiness with the marriage. This happiness-by–sex effect occurred regardless of how strong or happy the marriage was at the beginning of the study; frequent sex encourages marital happiness for neurotic newlyweds.

The study is found in the current Social Psychological and Personality Science (published by SAGE).
 

Article contributed by
Advanced Member

John M. Grohol

Psychologist

Dr. John Grohol is a mental health expert and founder of Psych Central. He has been writing about online behavior, mental health and psychology issues, and the intersection of technology and psychology since 1992.

Location: Newburyport, MA
Credentials: PsyD
Website: PsychCentral
Other Articles/News by John M. Grohol:

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