Watch Me: The Self-Centered influence of Social Media

Self, Family

One expert explains what sharing too much on social media reveals about your personality.

Every parent who has a three-year-old knows the phrase, "Watch me." Toddlers want to be watched when they jump, go down the slide, act silly with their toys, or anything they are involved with. They need their parents to watch and enjoy their feat. This behavior is normal, and a fun part of having a toddler.

It isn't as much fun when that toddler is 17, 18 or 19, and well into adulthood. In fact, the young adult doesn't really care if mom or dad is watching them, but they do care if everyone else is. They want the hundreds of viewers to watch them on YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, chat rooms, and anywhere virtual strangers can tune in to watch. It doesn't matter if they don't know you, they want to entertain you, and get "likes" so they know they are on track with pleasing you. Some of them do drastic, dangerous stunts to get more viewers, and some of them cannot sleep at night if they didn't get the attention and approval they thought they should or would.

What is this new phenomenon? It's the inner world of kids and adults who are becoming so self-focused that they are expanding the diagnosis of narcissism. It is a self-love, a need for attention to keep the fragile inner ego convinced it is liked. A new study from the University of Michigan questioned if Facebook could help diagnose narcissistic personality disorder, and found that young adult college students who posted more often on Facebook and Twitter scored higher in specific measures of different types of narcissism, including personality traits such as being exhibitionists, exploitive, and feeling superior. This may cause them to over-evaluate the importance of their opinion. Keep reading...

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