When Love Goes Wrong – Really Wrong (The Jodi Arias Case)

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When Love Goes Wrong – Really Wrong (The Jodi Arias Case)
Notorious murderer Jodi Arias - honest talk about abuse, the death penalty and forgiveness

8. The 8th Amendment to the US constitution says “Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.”
The US Supreme Court says that lethal injection does not violate the 8th amendment cruel and unusual punishment clause, they say, because it’s the most humane killing we know. Yet, the same Court found in other cases that tying a prisoner to a hitching post for 7 hours, or beating a prisoner to the point of damaging his dental plate, is a violation. The Supreme Court continues to look towards “evolving standards of decency.”

In our society, where retaliation and punishment are termed “justice,” and religious and spiritual notions of justice such as compassion and forgiveness are saved for the 2 hour church block, legislators and justices rest on the laurels of the pulse of the country. 

9. In some states, mentally ill people and those under 18 when the crime was committed can not be executed. In other states, it is allowed.

10. Is killing people to show that killing is wrong a stance we, as a nation should take? Recently, Governor John Hickenlooper from Colorado, in announcing a temporary execution reprieve said "It is a legitimate question whether we as a state should be taking lives," and referred to the death penalty as an "inequitable system."

San Quentin Warden Jeanne Woodford stated last year that “People wait years for an execution that may or may not happen. People come to the prison thinking that the execution will somehow bring closure to them. I’ve just never had someone who that’s happened to. In fact, I’ve had reporters tell me that family members told them a month or two after the execution that they regretted having been involved in the process.”

Justice by another name…Forgiveness

Of course, in the Jodi Arias case, it just may be too soon to talk about forgiveness. Obviously from the testimony, Travis Alexander’s family are still in pain and are asking for the death penalty, stating it will bring closure.

San Quentin Warden Jeanne Woodford stated last year that “People wait years for an execution that may or may not happen. People come to the prison thinking that the execution will somehow bring closure to them. I’ve just never had someone who that’s happened to. In fact, I’ve had reporters tell me that family members told them a month or two after the execution that they regretted having been involved in the process.”
In reality, the desire for closure may not come from another killing, but rather from the personal journey of the family and friends involved.

In the 2012 article, Does The Death Penalty Provide ‘Closure’ to Victim’s Families? Three Perspectives by Lisa Aliferis, she tells the story of Gayle Orr, whose 19 year old daughter was stabbed and murdered. She says she entered a “period of darkness” where she was isolated and consumed with rage.

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