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The Power of Self Talk

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We’re all doing it, almost all the time. We talk to ourselves. Most of us, at least most of...

We’re all doing it, almost all the time.  We talk to ourselves.  Most of us, at least most of the time manage to contain the voices inside our heads to our heads.  However, don’t kid yourself.  You have an inner voice and you are listening to it.  The voice inside your head is either your greatest enemy or your best friend and most powerful ally.   The good news about that is you have a lot more control of that voice than you probably think.

Self talk is very different from person to person.  Personality, learning type, and childhood history all have an impact on how that voice comes through, as does gender and even religious background.  For some people that voice almost always starts by saying, “You”.  For example, “You are such an idiot!”

or “You are did really well with that!”  For others the voice is more narrative in tone.  For example, “That was really bad.” or “It always goes this way for me.”

Most of the time when people are forced to identify the voice in their head two things come to the surface.  First of all they feel like they have little to no actual control over that inner dialog as if it’s somehow disembodied.  Secondly, they are usually surprised as to how cruel that voice really is.

I’m not going to say you always have control over the voice.  Some might say that, but to be honest I disagree.  Sometimes a thought comes up that is an immediate response to stimulus.  However, I will say that thoughts are habitual.  So, at the very least when you recognize you are having an unconscious cruel thought, you can consciously offer a rebuttal and make it a good one.   Even better you can flood your brain with the rebuttal thought in an effort to reprogram the thought habit.

Personally, I am a narrator.  So, for me it would go like this.   “Situations like this stress me out.  It seems like they always get out of control.”

BOOM – Defeating narrative self talk.  However, now that I caught it I can really use it to my advantage.  Not only can I reprogram that thought pattern with one I prefer, but I can also use this as opportunity to leverage deliberation creation to create a situation that works out better for me.

“I’ve noticed I’m getting better and better at this.  Things almost always go my way.  The Universe has my back.”

“I’ve noticed I’m getting better and better at this.  Things almost always go my way.  The Universe has my back.”

“I’ve noticed I’m getting better and better at this.  Things almost always go my way.  The Universe has my back.”

“I’ve noticed I’m getting better and better at this.  Things almost always go my way.  The Universe has my back.”

“I’ve noticed I’m getting better and better at this.  Things almost always go my way.  The Universe has my back.”

Over, and over again.  Self talk is too powerful to get lazy or loosey goosey.  The tone and content of your inner dialog will not only determine your level of happiness, but also your level of success.  So, when it comes to consciously reprogramming a thought and thinking intentionally, you can’t really over-do it.  Control take attention, intention, and consistency.

I challenge you to join me in a one week experiment.  For seven days really listen to what you’re saying to yourself.  It’s worth tuning into, because your subconscious is already paying very close attention.  Take notes.  Notice themes.  Figure out how you hear that voice.  Does it come in the form of a “You” reference or are you a narrator.   When you catch that voice misbehaving, don’t just ignore it, don’t judge it.  Just retrain it.  Imagine the momentum you can create by creating five to one positive thoughts, or even ten to one positive to negative thoughts.  It doesn’t take long to get that momentum working in your favor.

This article was originally published at . Reprinted with permission from the author.

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