8 Pieces Of Common Advice That Will Derail Your Relationship

By

8 Pieces Of Common Advice That Will Derail Your Relationship
Advice from well-meaning friends and family doesn't always help and may even be harmful.
  1. "You just need to learn communication skills."

This isn't necessarily bad advice. It just isn't enough, said Behary. "I can teach you the mechanics [of good communication] but it's not going to stick until you figure out what drives you and gets you stirred up."

For instance, a husband promises to be home early to spend time with his wife and kids, but because of work demands, he continues running late and his wife continues feeling disappointed. When he gets home, before she even says anything, he's angry and defensive.

 

Saying all the right things won't help him understand that he anticipates being the bad guy, and this triggers his reactions, Behary said.

It's not just about learning to communicate better. "Sometimes it's about the emotions behind the words."

  1. "Don't spill your secrets to a stranger."

Because of their own biases, some friends and family will advise against seeking professional help, Behary said. They also may be too much on your side, she said.

They might express some version of: "Don't go talking to a therapist. They'll just mess up your head, and blame your parents for everything. This isn't your problem. You're perfectly fine. It's [his or her] fault."

It's important for partners to examine how each of them is contributing to their marital problems. Going to therapy helps you figure this out and improve your relationship with the support of an objective and trained professional.

Ultimately, if you're getting advice from loved ones on navigating your relationship, remember that people have their own biases and motivations (well-intended or not). You also may get confusing or mixed messages, Behary said. Plus, "not everyone is trying to protect you."

If you're giving advice to a loved one, said Behary, the best thing you can do is to listen, be comforting and encourage the person to seek help.

This article was originally published at psychcentral.com. Reprinted with permission.

More Love Advice on YourTango:

Article contributed by
Advanced Member

John M. Grohol

Psychologist

Dr. John Grohol is a mental health expert and founder of Psych Central. He has been writing about online behavior, mental health and psychology issues, and the intersection of technology and psychology since 1992.

Location: Newburyport, MA
Credentials: PsyD
Website: PsychCentral
Other Articles/News by John M. Grohol:

What is Your Attitude Toward Sex?

By

This guest article from Psych Central was written by Diana C. Pitaru, M.S., L.P.C. Our culture has an interestingly bizarre, confusion laden relationship with sex. While teens are expected to “just say no” the average adult struggles to come to a resolution and find a consistent understanding of what sex is and how it figures and fits into ... Read more

3 Ways To Stop An Abusive Relationship ... BEFORE It Happens

By

This guest article from Psych Central was written by David Sack, M.D. One of the most heartbreaking things about abusive relationships is how much they can LOOK like real, genuine love in the beginning. You often get swept off their feet, passionately courted, and made to feel more special than you ever have before. Then comes the crash. The desire to ... Read more

Don't Get Married Until You Hash Out These 9 Issues

By

There probably aren’t many people who haven’t heard the words "marriages take a lot of work."  This is a good thing to be aware of before your marriage. That way you won't feel surprised or blindsided when the inevitable breakdowns occur. But you should also be aware of just how much work we're talking ... Read more

See More

 
Latest Expert Videos
ASK YOURTANGO MORE QUESTIONS
Most Popular