Do You and Your Partner Argue About Money?

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Do You and Your Partner Argue About Money?
It really is possible to stop arguing about money with your mate--read this article to find out how!
  •  Consider separate accounts. Have a joint account for all expenses in the relationship, and then a separate account for each of you to have a personal stash to spend, or save, each month. Income percentages can help determine how much of the leftover money each month should go to each, but some may decide to split the remainder each month equally, even if one brings in more income.
  •  Pool your money. This way there is no hierarchy in the money relationship. The money all goes into a joint account. The expenses are paid for directly from this, and then remaining money is allocated to agreed accounts (coming up next).
  • Discuss how to handle flex money. After expenses, where should the remaining money go? Should it stay fully pooled? Be split evenly? Go to a joint savings, retirement fund, vacation account, entertainment, college, etc.? This is all up for discussion when setting money guidelines for your relationship.
  • Consider a monthly budget. Create a monthly plan for spending that makes both partners comfortable.

2) Remove the power differential. This is especially the case for marriages where one partner makes significantly more than the other. Allowing the amount of money you bring to the relationship to suggest a status of power (or inferiority) can be destructive, even if it seems to make logical sense that making more money would put a person more in charge of it. In order to have a balanced relationship, the components within the relationship have to be balanced — which means understanding that if a marriage is going to avoid money-related conflict, the earnings are for the unit, not just for the self.

3) Learn about your partner’s relationship with money. A little understanding can go a long way. Rather than having the same argument over and over, learn about the money dynamic in your relationship and your partner’s past. How did your partner experience money growing up? How did you? Knowing what you are working with in each other’s past can help you be more sensitive to current needs and desires, and help pave the way for compromise.

There’s no perfect solution to money conflicts. The suggestions above are meant to help both partners be on the same page. The more that’s decided together in advance, the less there will be to disagree about later on. Keeping the conversation open is healthy — communicating with your partner as things come up, and then re-compromising to make changes as necessary. Always keep in mind that you’re both together, as a team in this — it’s not one versus the other. Money doesn’t have to be a battle, it just needs to be an open topic of discussion.

 

This article was originally published at . Reprinted with permission from the author.
Article contributed by
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John M. Grohol

Psychologist

Dr. John Grohol is a mental health expert and founder of Psych Central. He has been writing about online behavior, mental health and psychology issues, and the intersection of technology and psychology since 1992.

Location: Newburyport, MA
Credentials: PsyD
Website: PsychCentral
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