8 Simple Tips for Keeping Your Relationship Emotionally Fit

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8 Simple Tips for Keeping Your Relationship Emotionally Fit
Read about how the small stuff matters in keeping your love alive in this article from Psych Central

This guest article from Psych Central was written by Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S.

Self-care is key for our spiritual, emotional and physical health. You probably partake in a variety of nourishing habits every day — from the bare essentials of taking a shower and brushing your teeth to getting enough sleep, exercising and meditating.

The same is true for relationships: They require daily care to stay healthy.

It’s important for couples to nourish their relationships on a regular basis. But this doesn’t mean sweeping, dramatic acts. The seemingly small stuff counts, and it goes a very long way.

In his book Emotional Fitness for Couples, psychotherapist Barton Goldsmith, Ph.D, shares simple ways couples can stay in shape and become closer and stronger every day.

Here are eight ideas from his helpful book.

 

1. Create a special, secret way to say “I love you.”

According to Goldsmith, saying “I love you” creates a safe and secure space. Think about how you can make this a unique ritual. In the book he features an example of a happily married couple who texts each other “111” and “111-2” to signify “I love you.”

2. Engage in random acts of love.

Goldsmith suggests each partner make a list of loving acts you’d like the other to perform, such as a backrub or breakfast in bed. Exchange your lists, and aim to do something from your partner’s list once a week.

3. Go to bed together.

“Sleeping together is one of the most important parts of a relationship,” Goldsmith writes. Even if you have different schedules, this can be done. Goldsmith gives an example of a couple who always go to bed together, even though she goes to bed at 8:30 p.m. and he gets his best ideas at night. They lay together until she falls asleep. Then he reads, writes or gets up and watches TV. Goldsmith suggests creating a bedtime routine, which might include anything from reading from a fave book together to snuggling while watching TV.

4. Do romantic deeds.

“If you want to express your romantic feelings to someone you love, do something, anything, rather than nothing,” Goldsmith writes. Romance doesn’t need to be a grand getaway. Again, small totally counts. For instance, he explains that one flower tends to have the same effect as a bouquet. He suggests talking to each other about what you find romantic and creating a romance “wish list,” which you can exchange.

5. Make yourself happy.

Partners are not responsible for each other’s happiness. As Goldsmith says, “Happiness is an inside job.” Thinking otherwise can chip away at your relationship. One way to be happier is to keep a gratitude journal. Goldsmith suggests jotting down five things you’re grateful for every night and reading it in the morning. If you’re not sure what makes you happy, ask your partner. They usually notice what contributes to your joy.

This article was originally published at . Reprinted with permission.
Article contributed by
Advanced Member

John M. Grohol

Psychologist

Dr. John Grohol is a mental health expert and founder of Psych Central. He has been writing about online behavior, mental health and psychology issues, and the intersection of technology and psychology since 1992.

Location: Newburyport, MA
Credentials: PsyD
Website: PsychCentral
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