7 Tips For Making Long-Distance Love Last

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Communicate daily and other tips to make the most of your long-distance relationship.

3. Have an end goal. Orbuch strongly suggested couples talk about the future of their relationship and "when you'll move back together again." As she explained, this shows to both people that the "relationship is going somewhere" and your efforts are worthwhile. It helps to agree on a timeframe, but Orbuch said that at least trying to create one is a good start. And "Be realistic in your assessment of this relationship timetable," she added.

4. Communicate every day. Let's face it: many partners don't enjoy talking on the phone; some find texting irritating; and others can't stand technology in general. But keeping that emotional connection is key, Orbuch said. Of course, you don't have to have long, heart-to-heart talks every time. Orbuch suggested the following: "telling each other about your little triumphs and tragedies, ask[ing] for advice [and] talk[ing] about your day." Use your preferred mode of communication, whether that's talking or texting on your phone, email or video chats.
And don't forget about old-school approaches. "Also sending letters, notes and greeting cards are wonderful ways to surprise each other!" Orbuch said. Flowers and small gifts are great, too, she added.

 

5. See each other regularly. It's essential to make visiting each other a priority. Again, set clear expectations about how often you'll visit each other and who'll visit whom, Orbuch said.

6. Work on your trust issues. According to Orbuch, jealousy is a common challenge for long-distance couples. "Each of you will go out with friends, stay late at work, or not be there when you call (because of a previous engagement/activity)," she said. The solution? Communication and trust. "Talk often about how you feel toward one another, remember to trust each other until there is reason not to, and keep your suspicions out of the relationship."

7. Make it to important events. "One of the reasons we commit to a long-term relationship is to have someone there to share the good and bad times with us," Orbuch said. Being there for special celebrations and engagements is an important way to support your partner and relationship.

This article was originally published at . Reprinted with permission.
Article contributed by
Advanced Member

John M. Grohol

Psychologist

Dr. John Grohol is a mental health expert and founder of Psych Central. He has been writing about online behavior, mental health and psychology issues, and the intersection of technology and psychology since 1992.

Location: Newburyport, MA
Credentials: PsyD
Website: PsychCentral
Other Articles/News by John M. Grohol:

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