10 Ways To Get A Woman To Notice You On Tinder

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10 TIPS FOR TINDERFELLAS
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Use some of these helpful hints for online dating and you might just meet the woman of your dreams.

I’ve spent the past year choosing to be unattached. I’ve occasionally gone on dates when someone has caught my interest, but have yet to find someone with whom I want to spend my leisure time.  

However, over the past year, I have learned a lot about online dating. I’d like to share some advice with all of the single men out there. It is not meant to sound critical or judgmental. Consider it friendly advice from someone who cares.

(Disclaimer: These are my personal opinions and pet peeves, and not necessarily those held by all of the Tinderellas out there.)

To know how to get women on Tinder to notice you and date you, here are 10 things you need to know:

1. Don't hide your eyes.

If you only wear sunglasses in your pictures and do not show your eyes, I will swipe left. What exactly are you hiding? Or rather, hiding from?

Show your entire face or women will be skeptical. Likewise, one picture is not adequate. A few clear ones would be great!

I've found that it is rare for someone to look the same in person as they do on their profiles. I'm glad that the men I meet always seem pleased that they think I look the same in person as in my pictures.  

RELATED: An Expose Into The Sad, SCARY World Of Tinder And Online Dating

2. Hats are not sexy.  

Baseball caps, OK, yes. Not the cowboy ones or the ones with inappropriate messages on them. More importantly, if you have hats on in all of your pictures, as many Tinderfellas do, I will assume you are bald.

3. Please don’t post pictures of your kids.

It doesn’t make you more attractive, it just makes me question your integrity. More importantly, please don’t post pictures of other people’s kids.

You might be the greatest uncle that ever lived, but don’t use those gorgeous little faces as bait.

4. Use a practical photo of yourself.

Pictures of beautiful landscapes are great, but it doesn’t tell me anything about who you are specifically. I’m glad you have traveled to exotic destinations.  

However, profiles are to display pictures of yourself, not your vacations. Similarly, I do not need to see your car or your boat. I’m glad you are proud of them. You can show me those later if I decide to meet you.

RELATED: 5 Selfies In Your Tinder Profile That Are Keeping You Single

5. Don't post a grocery list of your dating requirements.

A litany of your dating requirements listed on your profile is not going to make all of the women flock to you. Leave all of your idiosyncratic rules and regulations out.  

Better yet, save them for a blog, like I do!

6. Keep on top of your pictures and make sure they are up to date.

Not just because you misrepresent yourself if you’re posting pictures from five years ago (which you are), but because nobody wants to see pictures of your ex that you forgot to remove, which are now automatically uploaded to dating apps from Facebook.

Watch YourTango Expert Dina Colada share Expert tips on the best online dating profile photos.

 

7. Give me time.

I’m not going to give you my number or meet you five minutes after we both swipe right. Patience, please.

8. Don't request me on social media so soon.

Facebook-friend-requesting me, or trying to add me on LinkedIn, particularly when we have not yet interacted, is not going to make me like you more. I’m not going to accept.

Rather, I’m going to think you’re a stalker and avoid you.

9. I don’t need to see pictures of your manhood.  

Enough said.

10. Don’t be afraid to actually be who you are.

Authenticity and genuineness are sexy. It makes a huge difference, at least to me.  

So, my dear Tinderfellas, go venture out into the online dating world, and enjoy the journey!

However, please think your decisions through as you do. There are wonderful women out there hoping to find a good man like yourself. Take off your sunglasses and hats and get swiping!

Jill Kofender is a licensed Clinical Psychologist in private practice in Michigan.

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