Good Kids, Bad Choices: When Parents Reach Wit's End

Good Kids, Bad Choices: When Parents Reach Wit's End

Good Kids, Bad Choices: When Parents Reach Wit's End

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By Sue Scheff for GalTime.com

 

Summer is almost here and some parents will be considering summer camps while others are in the midst of hoping their teenager passes the school year, or has enough credits to graduate. If you are the parent of a teen who is struggling with school and acting out, it can drive you to your wit's end.

 

Maybe your once fun-loving teenager who is good-looking, intelligent, and has lots of good friends is now talking back to you, staying out late or sneaking out, defiant, and possibly sexually active? On the flip side, your once sweet child might be a teenage misfit who is acting out because of bullying, or is experimenting with sex, drugs, and/or alcohol in a desperate attempt to find acceptance.

 

What happens when you have a teenager that decides they don't want to finish high school when they are more than capable? Perhaps they were consistently getting excellent grades and now they are just getting by or failing completely. From an overachiever to an underachiever. Or you have the teen that used to be a great athlete, was a popular kid in school--suddenly your child has become withdrawn and is hanging with a group of new peers that are less than desirable.

IS THIS TYPICAL TEEN BEHAVIOR?

 

Possible, but how do you know when it is and when you need to intervene?

As the school year is coming to an end, it is a good time for parents to evaluate where their teen is at both emotionally and academically--especially if they are in High School. These are your final years to make a significant difference in their lives, and get them on a positive road towards their futures. When a child is crying out for help by using illegal substances, running away, flunking in school, becoming secretive, possibly affiliating with a gang, or displaying other negative behavior, it is a parent's responsibility to get involved, as painful as that is, and seek treatment.

 

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When adolescents reach the point of rebelliousness, many parents will try therapy, and this is a good place to start. But the success of local treatment will depend on the child and how far their behavior has escalated. Unfortunately, many parents I have spoken to have reported that the one-hour session once a week -- or even twice a week -- rarely makes a difference in their teen's behavior.

 

For many parents there comes a time when residential therapy is taken under serious consideration--especially if drugs and/or alcohol are an issue. It is important to seek outside help, and removing a teen from their environment can be critical in getting them the help they need to heal. This is particularly true when a teen needs to be separated from undesirable peers that are instigating or perpetuating their negative behavior.

Though the majority of teens are unwilling to attend residential treatment, most of them are professionally transported by experts in the field. Parents spend a lot of time and stress about this part of the decision, but hiring a professional in this field can lessen the worries. They are trained to work with at-risk youth and will ask you all about your child before they arrive. In speaking with many parents and teens that have successfully used transports, the feedback is overwhelmingly positive.

 

At the end of the day, your teen truly wants to feel good about themselves again, too. They want to be that happy child that you remember. Remember, they were once a good kid, and they can become that good person again. Being a teenager isn't easy, and parenting that child when you have reached your wit's end is a challenge. Knowing you are not alone helps!

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TAKE AWAY TIPS FOR PARENTS:

When seeking residential treatment, I always encourage parents to look for three key components that I call the ACE factor:

 

Accredited Academics (Ask to see their accreditation): Education is important, some programs actually don't offer it.

Clinical (Credentialed therapists on staff): Please note--on staff.

Enrichment Programs (Animal assisted programs, culinary, fine arts, sports etc): Enrichment Programs are crucial to your child's program. They will help build self-esteem and stimulate them in a positive direction. Find a program with something your teen is passionate about, or used to be passionate prior their path in a negative direction.

I also encourage parents to avoid three red flags:

Marketing arms and sales reps (All those toll-free numbers, be careful of who you are really speaking to and what is in the best interest of your child.)

Short term programs (Wilderness programs or otherwise, rarely is there a quick fix. Short term program are usually short term results. They usually will then convince you to go into a longer term program after you are there a few weeks--why not just start with one? Consistency is key in recovery. An average program is 6-9-12 months, depending on your child's needs and the program.)

Statistics that show their success rate (I have yet to see any program or school have a third party--objective survey--perform a true statistical report on a program's success. Success is an individual's opinion. You have to do your own due diligence and call parent references.)
For more information about researching residential therapy and helpful tips, visit http://www.helpyourteens.com and don't forget to review the list of questions for schools and programs so you can make an educated decision.

 

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This article was originally published at . Reprinted with permission from the author.