How To Fight Fairly

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How To Fight Fairly
If you have the energy to create drama, you have more than enough to tone it down into a discussion.

Thirty years of marriage counseling and twenty-five years of a second marriage have convinced me that fights are not necessary in a marriage. Married couples need to have discussions, they need to solve problems, and sometimes they need to disagree, but they don’t need to squabble, argue, bicker or fight. Fights are dramatic, which is not helpful to a discussion. If you have enough energy to create drama, you have more than enough to tone it down into a discussion. However, because social expectations and mythology are so strong, many of my clients want guidelines for “fighting fair.” I’ve developed a set of Fair Fight Guidelines you may find helpful.

Fair Fight Guidelines
If you feel a fight is unavoidable, you can still find a win-win resolution if you follow these guidelines.

• Remember the point of the fight is to reach a solution, not to win, be right, or make your partner wrong.
• Don't try to mind read. Ask instead what he or she is thinking.
• Don’t bring up all the prior problems that relate to this one. Leave the past in the past; keep this about one recent problem. Solve one thing at a time.
• Keep the process simple. State the problem, suggest some alternatives, and choose a solution together.
• Don't talk too much at once. Keep your statements to two or three sentences. Your partner will not be able to grasp more than that.
• Give your partner a chance to respond and to suggest options.
• Practice equality. If something is important enough to one of you, it will inevitably be important to both of you, so honor your partner’s need to solve a problem.
• Ask and Answer questions directly. Again, keep it as simple as possible. Let your partner know you hear him or her.
• State your problem as a request, not a demand. To make it a positive request, use “I messages” and “please”.
• Don’t use power struggle tactics: guilt and obligation, threats and emotional blackmail, courtroom logic: peacekeeping, sacrificing, or hammering away are off limits.
• Know your facts: If you’re going to fight for something, know the facts about the problem: Do research, find out what options are available, and know how you feel and what would solve the problem for you.
• Ask for changes in behavior, don’t criticize character, ethics or morals.
• Don’t fight over who’s right or wrong. Opinions are opinions, and that won’t solve the problem. Instead, focus on what will work.
• Ask your partner if he or she has anything to add to the discussion. “Is there anything else we need to discuss now?”
• Don’t guess what your partner is thinking or feeling. Instead, ask. “What do you think? Or How do you feel about it?”
• Hold hands, look at each other, remember you’re partners.
• If you’re angry, express it calmly. “I’m angry about ……” There’s no need for drama, and it won’t get you what you want. Anger is satisfied by being acknowledged, and by creating change. Anger is a normal emotion—rage is phony, it’s drama created by not taking care of yourself.

This article was originally published at Tina B. Tessina. Reprinted with permission.
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Dr. Tina Tessina

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Tina B. Tessina, Ph.D.
http://www.tinatessina.com
tina@tinatessina.com
562-438-8077
Dr. Romance Blog: http://drromance.typepad.com/dr_romance_blog/
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Location: Long Beach, CA
Credentials: LMFT, MFT, PhD
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