Does Your Compassion Disappear When Someone's Angry?

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Does Your Compassion Disappear When Someone's Angry?
Learning to respond to a anger or blame in ways that promote caring is vital to relationship health.

Renee saw herself as a very compassionate person. She could easily feel into her husband Jeff's feelings when he was sad or scared. But as soon as Jeff got angry or judgmental with her, her fear became far greater than her compassion — fear of losing herself and of not being seen or cared about by Jeff. Out of her fear, Renee would often shut down into silence, or she would defend herself or try to talk Jeff out of being upset. Her tone would get parental and righteous as she protected herself against her fear. Or she would capitulate and just do whatever Jeff wanted her to do, but would then feel resentful. This dynamic was wreaking havoc with her marriage.

"Renee," I asked her in one of our phone sessions, "What happens inside of you when Jeff gets angry or judgmental?"

"My stomach goes into a knot. I get really scared, just like I did with my Dad."

"So your fear triggers you into your learned protections. What do you think would happen if you moved into a compassionate intent to learn with your own feelings? What would happen if you moved into compassion for yourself, for your scared little inner child?"

"I think if I did that, I wouldn't feel so scared."

"Right. You think you are scared only because of Jeff's anger, but I think you are also scared because you immediately abandon yourself in the face of his anger. You leave your inner little girl alone to deal with it, and all she knows to do is withdraw, defend, explain or give yourself up."

We explored what Renee could do differently if she was in compassion for her own feelings instead of trying to control Jeff.

"What if you told Jeff your truth and then moved into an intent to learn with him? What do you think would happen if you said to Jeff, 'When you yell at me, I feel punched in the stomach. It feels awful and stressful and scary, and makes it really hard for me to hear you. I really want to hear what you are trying to tell me. Can you say it to me without the anger and judgment? I'm listening.'"

"I think he would be shocked! He's constantly upset with me for not listening to him and try to talk him out of his position."

"So he tries to control you with his anger and judgment, and you try to control him with your withdrawal, defense, explanations or giving yourself up. Both of you are trying to control and neither of you are open to learning. But in order to be open to learning with him and be compassionate about his feelings, you first need to be compassionate about your own feelings."

"I can see that. I always want compassion from Jeff, yet it's obviously what I need to be giving to myself. I wonder why it's so hard for me to be compassionate toward my own feelings?"

"Good question. There must be a good reason. What do you think?"

This article was originally published at . Reprinted with permission from the author.
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Dr. Margaret Paul

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Margaret Paul, Ph.D. is a best-selling author of 8 books, relationship expert, and co-creator of the powerful Inner Bonding® process - featured on Oprah, and recommended by actress Lindsay Wagner and singer Alanis Morissette. Are you are ready to heal your pain and discover your joy? Take our FREE Inner Bonding course, and click here for a FREE CD/DVD relationship offer. Visit our website at innerbonding.com for more articles and help, as well as our Facebook Page. Phone and Skype sessions available. Join the thousands we have already helped and visit us now!

Location: Pacific Palisades, CA
Credentials: PhD
Specialties: Anxiety Issues, Couples/Marital Issues, Depression
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