Mindfulness: The Art of Cultivating Resilience

By

Mindfulness: The Art of Cultivating Resilience
In the spirit of Female Empowerment let's build the 3 R's: Reflection, Resilience, and Relationships

Undeniably, sooner or later, we all have to deal with life’s realities—those hard surprises and “unknowns” that can literally change everything in less than a nanosecond.

Imagine you’ve just been fired. Many of us would react to this situation in at least some of the following ways:

 

“I’m terrified."

"I should have seen this coming.”

“I’ll never find another job in this economy.”

“Am I going to be homeless?”

“I’m a failure.”

Reactions like these reflect a fear-based survival framework for viewing the situation, whereby we filter the external facts of what’s happening through the internal lens of what we feel (our thoughts, feelings, beliefs and body sensations). In this way, our fear creates our reality, locking us in anger, powerlessness, and blame.

Mindfulness: A Tool for Re-contextualizing and Reframing

“People are not afraid of things, but of how they view them.”- Epictetus

Although it’s understandable why we might react from fear when facing the prospect of losing our job, or other challenging situations, mindfulness is a powerful tool that offers us the opportunity to make a radical shift in orientation.

Mindfulness is the practice of bringing our awareness to what we are experiencing in the present, both internally and externally, without judgment (Kornfield, 2009). It is a wake-up call to become conscious of the ways we perceive and respond to life’s situations. When we live mindfully, we shift our entire ground of being.

Here’s a traditional, easy-to-follow exercise to help develop your mindfulness during difficult situations (Klau, 2009). Mindfulness takes time to develop. It is an ongoing process. Be kind and compassionate to yourself as you follow these instructions.

Sit in a quiet room where you won’t be disturbed.

Close your eyes and focus your attention on your breath.

It’s natural for your attention to become distracted. When that happens, simply return to your breath.

While focusing on your breath, allow your thoughts, feelings, beliefs, and body sensations to enter your awareness as you perceive the external situation.

Now ask yourself: What are the facts of the situation? What are my thoughts, feelings, beliefs and body sensations? How am I responding?

With practice, this exercise can bring us to our calm, reflective center. This safe-haven, in which we can rest and see more clearly, holds and contains everything arising for us in the present. From here, it is possible to deconstruct, re-contextualize and reframe our original fear-based feelings and reactions, honoring and embracing them without being their victims.

Article contributed by
Advanced Member

Dr. Lynda Klau

Author

 

 

Dr. Lynda Klau

Founder & Director of

Life Unlimited: The Center for Human Possibility

Guiding Individuals and Organizations from Fear to Freedom

www.DrLyndaKlau.com

1 212 595 7373

Location: New York, NY
Credentials: PhD
Specialties: Communication Problems, Couples/Marital Issues, Empowering Women
Other Articles/News by Dr. Lynda Klau:

Want To Evolve? Start From The Inside-Out

By

Last Friday evening I was at a dinner party and something a guest said pierced my heart deeply: "What our world needs is the "Evolution of Humanity."  In these three beautiful words I heard the music of a dream that I have be longing for since childhood. I often talk about taking the journey from fear to freedom and helping others do the ... Read more

Be More, Do Less And Save Time

By

I just came back from a BEING, DO NOTHING vacation. More than ever I spent time being and doing nothing. No agendas, no digital, no schedules. Lots of sleep, rests and more. I returned renewed, restored and relaxed beyond words. As human BEINGS we need Being time. Vacations are important, however, we need to have Being time everyday. The blog post ... Read more

10 Tips For Building Loving Relationships

By

What is love? That is an incredibly difficult question to answer. Throughout our lives we learn what it is to love from many different sources. People such as teachers, family members and lovers are all held responsible (to some degree) for the way we interpret love and interact with it when it’s in our presence. Whether through direct or indirect ... Read more

See More

 
Latest Expert Videos
ASK YOURTANGO MORE QUESTIONS
Must-see Videos
SEE MORE VIDEOS
Most Popular