ProConnect

Would You Rather Take The Pills Or Learn Some Skills?

By

Would You Rather Take The Pills Or Learn Some Skills?
Depressed? Psychotherapy teaches skills for living that last a lifetime.

In a society that embraces the use of pills for everything from oppositional childhood behavior to weight loss, it should come as no surprise that a recent study reveals that depression is overdiagnosed and overtreated with medication. The study, conducted at Johns Hopkins, finds that many people are taking antidepressant medication even though they do not meet the criteria for Major Depressive Disorder, the condition for which medication is most often appropriate.

To put this in context, let's say your child refuses to go to bed or hits her brother. I'm guessing your first line of attack is not to go to your doctor and ask for medication. Let's say you look in the mirror one day and recognize that you really need to lose 40 pounds or so. Is medication your first thought? Consider the losses we all experience living in this world: getting fired from a job, the death of a loved one, or divorce, just to name a few. Each of these, and a host of other life stresses, may result in depressed mood, difficulty sleeping, feeling hopeless and a drop in interest in pleasurable activities, all symptoms of what we would call an Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood.  Is a pill going to solve these life problems?

More from YourTango: Are You Addicted To Comfort?

More from YourTango: Develop A Recovery Routine To Avoid Post-Performance Blues

Most people are savvy about childhood behavior problems and weight loss. They know there are many ways to tackle behavior problems and they will often try quite a few before seeking medical help. In order to make a lasting change in your weight, you know you're going to have to make difficult changes in your relationship with the food and exercise. When all else fails, you ask your doctor.

It's very much the same with depression. I am not talking about people with lifelong depression, with family histories of depression and suicide, who may be thinking of suicide themselves; the relatively small number of people falling into this group are the most likely to benefit from medication. Most people who experience mild depression do not fall in this group. When they notice the symptoms they read about the problem, ask friends for suggestions or support, and try various solutions. People attempt to improve depressed mood with exercise, good sleep hygiene, a healthy diet, spending time doing positive things with friends, and pushing themselves to do important things despite feeling lethargic. It usually works. If you feel your efforts haven't resulted in improvement, or you just want to talk things out with someone, talking to your doctor certainly makes sense. But which doctor?

Share this with someone you love (or even like a lot)!

Let's make it
FB official
Article contributed by
Advanced Member

Dr. Judith Tutin

Family Coach

Judith Tutin, PhD, ACC

Location: Rome, GA
Credentials: ACC, PhD
Other Articles/News by Dr. Judith Tutin:

Are You Addicted To Comfort?

By

In our constant search for happiness and the good life, we may be shortchanging ourselves by seeking to eliminate all negative emotions, thoughts and experiences from our lives. That's what Robert Biswas-Diener and Todd Kashdan say in their forthcoming book, The Upside of Your Darkside. You can see a preview in Biswas-Diener's TEDx talk about comfort ... Read more

Develop A Recovery Routine To Avoid Post-Performance Blues

By

In an ironic turn of events, the day after finishing a half-marathon, and a week after I finished writing a book, I came across my notes for a possible article about post-performance routines. It was sorely needed, as I was feeling the lackadaisical lassitude of the post-partier. It's easy to get caught up in the excitement of the party, but what ... Read more

Change Your Thoughts And Your Life Will Change

By

The way you do one thing is the way you do everything has been rattling around in my head since January, the day I heard it twice in one single day. When something strikes me as interesting, and then it comes up again, I figure it might be important. I also apply this strategy when listening as a therapist or coach, evidence that the adage applies for ... Read more

See More

Recent Expert Posts
Smooches

She's That Into You: Cracking the Code of Women

Women give off signals telling you how they feel.

Girlfriends

6 Texting Shockers You Must Avoid!

Sending your man a text message sounds easy enough, but get it wrong and it could be the end of you.

Blues

The addiction to "busy"ness: How to live with more intention

Is the daily routine of life getting you down? Find your passion and live a more authentic life!

Ask The Experts

Have a dating or relationship question?
Visit Ask YourTango and let our experts and community answer.

Resources
How to find the right pro for you
10 Reasons Mental Health Pros Should Join YourTango Experts

10 Reasons Mental Health Pros Should Join YourTango Experts

YourTango Experts can help your business go from good to great.

10 Steps To Improve Your Coaching Business

Take your coaching business from mediocre to great in no time…

Frequently Asked Questions About YourTango Experts

Thinking of joining? Here's all the facts you need to know to make the most of your membership.

Getting Your Guy To Join You In A Therapy Or Coaching Session

So how can your get your strong, self-reliant, superman to talk to an Expert with you?

Therapist/Counselors: Who We Are & What We Do

What exactly does a therapist/counselor do and can they really help?

See more resources>
HOT STUFF!
FROM OUR PARTNERS