Family Support Needed for Good Diabetes Control

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Family Support Needed for Good Diabetes Control
Spouses and parents can support or sabotage Diabetes Treatment. How can you help?

Do you find family members make it harder or easier for you to control your Diabetes? When performing a study at Vanderbuilt University on use of technology, researchers noted many conversations about family members. Rather than wanting emotional support, people with diabetes wanted practical help. Some of the people with diabetes suggested a spouse could help by reminding to take medication when going out, carrying extra medication in case the patient forgot, carrying an extra snack in case of hypoglycemia and avoiding non-supportive behaviors in the form of either sabotage or misguided help. Sabotage includes things like encouraging the diabetic to eat cookies or packing lunch for a picnic and bringing regular but not diet soda. Misguided help is often seen with teenagers where parents are so helpful they are perceived as nagging and the adolescent rebel. Is your family supportive, and what suggestions do you have for family members who are dealing with a spouse or child newly diagnosed? See http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/reporter/index.html?ID=12856 for the entire article.

MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her health care provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation, or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.Do you find family members make it harder or easier for you to control your Diabetes? When performing a study at Vanderbuilt University on use of technology, researchers noted many conversations about family members. Rather than wanting emotional support, people with diabetes wanted practical help. Some of the people with diabetes suggested a spouse could help by reminding to take medication when going out, carrying extra medication in case the patient forgot, carrying an extra snack in case of hypoglycemia and avoiding non-supportive behaviors in the form of either sabotage or misguided help. Sabotage includes things like encouraging the diabetic to eat cookies or packing lunch for a picnic and bringing regular but not diet soda. Misguided help is often seen with teenagers where parents are so helpful they are perceived as nagging and the adolescent rebel. For example, rather than encouraging your teen to exercise, so so as a family. Is your family supportive, and what suggestions do you have for family members who are dealing with a spouse or child newly diagnosed? See http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/reporter/index.html?ID=12856 for the entire article.

MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER: The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her health care provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation, or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship.

 
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