Helping Troubled Kids Succeed At School

By

Helping Troubled Kids Succeed At School
Trauma affects child development in school-age children ages 6-12. Here are some signs to watch for.

Child Development Ages 6 to 12 Years

Those early school years, when children ages 6 to 12 are transitioning from a caregiving environment to an educational environment, are challenging from a child development standpoint. Children are learning academic skills, socialization (how to get along with others), structure and boundaries (how to follow rules), and perhaps for the first time, are influenced by adults other than their own parents.

Primary or elementary school is a time to find out how people are different in so many ways: race, ethnicity, gender, physical abilities, culture, upbringing, values, etc. A child's self-esteem develops based on academic and social successes or failures. Adult expectations for responsible behaviors increase as children are expected to need less adult interactions to maintain established routines at home and school.

The adult world looks upon this transition from home to school as a natural part of what it takes to grow into a competent, capable, responsible adult. It is a time to learn what to do and how to do it. Most children make the transition easily, get into alignment with learning and do what is expected of them with the usual glitches or hiccups along the way. This is normal in the world of child development.

Children of Trauma React Differently

For other children, those who have undergone some sort of trauma in their lives, the transition is a nightmare not only for them but also for their caregivers and parents. Trauma for these children wasn't a single-incident trauma; they had experienced multiple traumas that had been ongoing their entire lives. They come from families of intergenerational abuse, alcoholism, drug addiction, neglect, physical and sexual abuse, frequent moves, absent fathers, mothers who were depressed or had to work two or three jobs, poverty, and emotionally-absent caregivers. Some children eat only when they are in school. On weekends and in the summer they may get to eat once a day.

This was the population of children I worked with in a small east Texas rural community in a drop-out prevention program. Beginning with pre-K and ending in high school, the children I worked with taught me what I knew, what I didn't, and what I needed to learn.

I was surprised at the intense behavioral issues of the children who were referred to me in pre-K to fifth grade. For those of us who love to learn and read, it is difficult at first to understand children who refuse to read or do their work. Compounding that are those children who are aggressive, defiant and hostile to teachers. "I would have never thought of doing any of that when I was growing up," is what I said to myself, and what you're probably thinking right now.

As I got to know these children, heard their stories, and listened to their parents, I learned it wasn’t that parents didn't love their children. They had been traumatized as well and did not know how to give their children what they never got. This kept them from being able to meet basic attachment and emotional needs. If that foundation has not been met minimally, a child has difficulties with social and emotional issues in groups, which shuts down their ability to learn.

Over time, I came to learn more about what these children have been going through for years at home. It's difficult to view life from their perspective and relate to the number of stressors they experience every day at home and at school, yet that is exactly what we must do to help them succeed.

Trauma Reactive Behaviors in School-Age Children

The following is a list of trauma reactive behaviors you may observe in early school-age children:

  1. Regressive behaviors: clinging, crying, baby talk
  2. Competitiveness and jealousy with younger siblings or peers
  3. Hyperactivity or always on guard; can't sit still
  4. Anxious talking
  5. A child who has been compliant may become irritable, aggressive or oppositional
  6. Uncharacteristic fears of people, place, objects
  7. Drops in school performance
  8. Staying off task, withdrawn, shut down
  9. Day dreaming, spacey eyes, pupils dilated
  10. Sexual acting out behaviors with siblings, peers, or in play
  11. Difficulty concentrating or paying attention
  12. Appearing confused
  13. Uncoordinated and clumsy
  14. Acting emotionally younger than their age

Children who have undergone trauma feel like no one understands them, that they are not loved and that they are failures. Imagine day in and day out going somewhere that only reflects how much you have failed, all that you do wrong, and the vast difference between you and your peers. You don't fit in. 

That is what these children feel. How could they not?

My website offers more resources that can help you go from a good parent to a great one. If you'd like to speak with someone about ways you can help your child, I am available for telephone coaching sessions.

 

More Parenting Advice from YourTango:

Soulfull Woman Deborah Chelette-Wilson is a Licensed Professional Counselor, speaker and life coach who has helped many women find that elusive “something missing” in their lives. Are you ready to step onto the path that leads to a fulfilling and enriching life? Sign up to receive Deborah's newsletter, Discovering Your Heart and Soul, to get started on your own personal journey to awaken a more authentic and soulfull You.

This article was originally published at . Reprinted with permission from the author.
Article contributed by
Advanced Member

Deborah Chelette-Wilson

Counselor/Therapist

Soulfull Woman Deborah Chelette-Wilson is a Licensed Professional Counselor, speaker and life coach who has helped many women find that elusive “something missing” in their lives. We are often pulled in so many directions, that it’s difficult to know how to put ourselves on our own To Do list. Deborah offers a 15-minute free life coaching session exclusive to YourTango readers to help you identify what steps you can take to finding a more stress-free and soulfull You.

Location: Winnsboro, TX
Credentials: LPC, NCC
Specialties: Empowering Women
Other Articles/News by Deborah Chelette-Wilson:

Set Reasonable Goals For Yourself

By

Last month we talked about focusing on goals. This month builds on those ideas with an emphasis on realizing that unreasonable goals are not sustainable. A case in point was brought to mind about how easy it is to slip into struggling to "make something happen." "Rena" is a 62-year-old female client who had been working hard to reach a ... Read more

Stop Being Afraid Of Life, And Start Living It

By

A client told me about a time when she was about ten years old and she awoke one morning to find the house was icy cold. Her stepdad was not at home, but she had watched him build fires in the fireplace (their only source of heat) many times. She decided she could do it and make the house warm for her mother and siblings. She completed the task successfully, ... Read more

What's The Deal With Kids Today? Your Stress

By

Since the early 90s, I have noticed a disturbing trend: children's problem behaviors seem to be getting more complicated and they are not responding to discipline that has worked in the past. From parents, caregivers and teachers I consistently hear, "I've tried everything and nothing seems to work. I spank them, ground them, send them to bed ... Read more

See More

GET MORE ARTICLES LIKE THIS IN YOUR INBOX!

Sign up for our daily email and get the stories everyone is talking about.

Ask The Experts

Have a dating or relationship question?
Visit Ask YourTango and let our experts and community answer.

FROM AROUND THE WEB