Bullying, the Beginning of Violence – Part 1

By

Bullying, the Beginning of Violence – Part 1
Examine the facts about bullying: Each day 160,000+ students skip school because of bullying.

At the recent workshop on Parenting Skills “Upgrade” we discussed how life has changed and how things are more stressful for all of us including children. A common theme I’m beginning to see is the need for us to upgrade our understanding of how stress takes us out of relationship with ourselves and others. How the traumatizers not only traumatize others but themselves. We have gotten into negative neurophysiological feedback loops within ourselves and each other.

In the next two newsletters, I want to “upgrade” your understanding of the issue of Bullying because it reflects the tip of the iceberg of violent behavior that can only be shifted through understanding that what is driving the behavior we see is what is beneath the iceberg.  We have the ways and means to turn things around; all we need to add is a willingness to join the path others are leading.

Beginning with ourselves we need to awaken to and tame what hides within ready to spring out on others. Children reflect what they have learned and are learning from the adult world whether from parents, teachers, the media, religious and other organizations. We can’t expect our children to do better than we are doing. Yet that is what we continue to do. We continue to have a punitive mentality when it comes to mistakes children make as a natural course of being a child.

We expect children to think and act like adults. I’m not so sure when it comes to the issue of bullying that they are not doing that. We have workplace violence, domestic violence, and world-wide violence against women and girls because they are female. The value and history of women is still not given a proper place even with organizations like the National Women’s History Project.

I recently watched the movie Bully and read the companion book. The movie released in April, 2012 is a documentary that began in 2009 after much research by Director Lee Hirsch and Producer Cynthia Lowen. They decided that in order to fully capture the reality of this issue, they would need to be able to get on the front lines. This meant finding a school that would be willing to allow them to film what went on in the student body for an entire academic year, not an easy task. The Workplace Bullying Institute in Bellingham, Wash., is run by Gary and Ruth Namie, who are dedicated to the eradication of workplace bullying. They had recently published the first study of the incidences of workplace bullying funded by The Waitt Institute for Violence Prevention based in Sioux City, Iowa. The executive director of WIVP, Cindy Waitt, introduced Hirsch and Lowen to Sioux City Superintendent Dr. Paul Gausman, and they subsequently received permission from the Sioux City Community School Board to film throughout the school district for the 2009-2010 school year: a very courageous move on their part.

This article was originally published at . Reprinted with permission.
Article contributed by

Deborah Chelette-Wilson

Counselor/Therapist

Soulfull Woman Deborah Chelette-Wilson is a Licensed Professional Counselor, speaker and life coach who has helped many women find that elusive “something missing” in their lives. We are often pulled in so many directions, that it’s difficult to know how to put ourselves on our own To Do list. Deborah offers a 15-minute free life coaching session exclusive to YourTango readers to help you identify what steps you can take to finding a more stress-free and soulfull You.

Location: Winnsboro, TX
Credentials: LPC, NCC
Specialties: Empowering Women
Other Articles/News by Deborah Chelette-Wilson:

Responding From Love Rather Than Reacting From Fear

By

I actually had a reaction to thinking about this title. It sounds like it's something we'd say in "Fantasy Land." It may seem counterintuitive to even think that responding from a love is something that can be done in our age of chaos, uncertainty and escalating worldwide violent acts. It isn't. Responding from love is practical and ... Read more

Stop Dating The Same Types Of People Over (And Over) Again

By

I grew up desperately seeking love, kindness and guidance from parents who were unable to meet my emotional needs. It is not pleasant to admit that, but it is true. It is also true that I transferred that desperate neediness as a young adult into relationships with men who couldn't meet my emotional needs either. I've often said, "Men have been a ... Read more

I Was Abused, So I Took Revenge — And Became A Therapist

By

One of the things I have come to appreciate about myself is my willingness to continue to learn, to grow and to heal my wounds. I don't see how I can ask my clients to go into their dark places if I'm not willing to go into my own. Even with all my education, training and skills, when I work with someone, I need to be able to meet them with my heart in ... Read more

See More

PARTNER POSTS