Can 'Female Viagra' Turn You Into A MAGICAL SEX UNICORN?!

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Is this little pink pill the answer to your low libido woes?

A pharmaceutical breakthrough — the so-called miracle pill, Flibanserin — was approved last summer by the FDA, and has since been dubbed "Viagra for women" by the media.

That sentiment, however, is a bit misleading.

Sold under the brand name Addyi to treat hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in women, countless articles have popped up singing its praises, mainly along the lines of: “Viagra has been available for 17 years, it’s about time people with clitorses have a similar option!

Is Flibanserin like Viagra? Nope, not at all.

These drugs are two very different animals, and for two main reasons.

1. Medications for men's sexual performance don’t work on the brain to create a desire for sex or enhance pleasure. Women's do.

Viagra and Cialis are vasodilators intended to treat erectile dysfunction. In other words, they get blood pumping to the right places so the penis becomes erect.

Remember, just because someone has an erection, that doesn’t necessarily mean their libido is also revving full steam.

Flibanserin, on the other hand, wasn’t designed to pump blood to the genitals like pills for erectile dysfunction. This is a psychoactive drug that works in the brain to increase sexual desire.

The medical abstracts tell us, “Flibanserin works by correcting an imbalance of the levels of the neurotransmitters that affect sexual desire. More specifically, Flibanserin increases dopamine and norepinephrine, both responsible for sexual excitement, and decreases serotonin, responsible for sexual inhibition.

In fact, Flibanserin was originally developed as an antidepressant in the same class as Wellbutrin. It was only after researchers noted some women reporting increased sexual desire they switched the focus of their research to sexual dysfunction in women.

Women who show symptoms of HSDD “are uninterested in sex regardless of mood or occasion, capped off with a heavy dose of distress and anxiety over doing the deed. Most importantly, their problem exists in the absence of any other notable culprits — psychiatric problems, for example, or drug side effects, or an inattentive partner.

The root of the problem, so to speak, is completely different for men and women, which means the solution MUST be different as well.

2. Medication's for men's sexual performance can be taken casually. Women's cannot.

Drugs like Viagra and Cialis are also commonly called “weekend pills” — meaning you can just pop one when you want to feel "ready" and experience an immediate effect.

Flibanserin, on the other hand, needs to be taken daily for about 3 months before brain chemistry pathways are affected enough to modestly improve sexual desire in some women. After that, it needs to be taken regularly to maintain it’s effectiveness.

And what’s this about "modestly" and “some women”? ...

Basically, once you’re on it, you need to commit to it for the long haul.

That makes it all the more important to note that Flibanserin can cause quite a few side effects — including low blood pressure, dizziness and fainting, dry mouth, nausea, and serious negative interactions with alcohol — and it cannot be taken by women on hormonal birth control.

Hmm, that’s a lot of “ifs” and "possible" side effects for me ...

It turns out this little pink answer to women’s sexual dysfunction many not be an answer for the majority of women with low libido.

While HSDD is said to affect 10% of women, many of us in the field may argue that number seems a little low based on anecdotal evidence. Yet, according to the FDA, 8-13% of women who take this medication regularly will average only 0.5% more “sexual satisfying events” per month.

Ouch! That’s it?

Finally, the company behind brand name Addyi has created a marketing nightmare, setting a price of $800 for a one-month supply. That is nearly twice as much as the cost of erectile dysfunction medications, and has caused both insurance companies and pharmacies alike to balk. 

That’s a lot of money, time and risk of potential side effects for something that may only help a handful of people get a tiny bit of better sex.

Is there a better answer? Yes!

My recommendation is to try less invasive and more reliable solutions first before turning to a drug like Flibanserin.

Much of the work I do centers around one reoccurring theme: “How do I put the spark back in the bedroom? My partner and I don’t have sex as often as we used to and when we do it’s not as exciting. How do we fix this?

Sexual dissatisfaction in long term relationships is very common, and often not the result of medical dysfunction.

It's normal that if we keep doing the same thing with the same person over and over for it to eventually become predictable and boring. It’s also something we can easily overcome if we have the right skills and resources.

One of the most important things we can do to reinvigorate our sex lives is to try new things and learn to communicate better with our partner(s) about our desires and fantasies.

My recommendation is to take that $800 a month and instead of spending it on a medication as a first option, spend it on things like date nights, sex toys, experimenting with BDSM gear, taking couples classes, buying books about sex, or even trying private sex coaching/therapy instead.

You just may discover that a little bit of novelty and a different approach to sex will net you better results than the latest “miracle pill.”

This article was originally published at SunnyMegatron.com. Reprinted with permission from the author.

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