Social Media Lowers Stress In Women (But Guys Aren't So Lucky)

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That stress headache is related to something else, says science.

From the time I wake up in the morning, until the time I go to bed at night, I am constantly on my phone or computer. I receive anywhere from 50 to 60 work-related emails a day, I am constantly browsing Twitter for story ideas, and am definitely on Facebook more than I should be, for work reasons, of course. Between the work aspect related to how I use social media and the personal aspect, one would think I'd be completely stressed out by it, but science says that I'm not. So, I can deduce that this stress headache is related to something else. Thanks, science!

A new study has found that social media can actually be thanked for lower stress in women. According to the study of 1,801 adults, "Compared with a woman who does not use these technologies, a women who uses Twitter several times per day, sends or receives 25 emails per day, and shares two digital pictures through her mobile phone per day, scores 21 percent lower on our stress measure than a woman who does not use these technologies at all." I guess that explains why my sister and her technology-free lifestyle is always about one minute away from a total breakdown.

But the reason men don't have it so great when it comes to stress and social media is how they use it. Women tend to be more emotionally invested in what they choose to share on social media, while men are far more reserved.

As the study notes, this is psychologically healthy for women so they benefit most, as least temporarily. Due to that emotional investment women can see a bit of a rise in stress when things are going poorly in their friends' lives, because they are "infected" by the negativity. However, when things are going great for their friends, women can relax and so does their stress level.

While past studies have linked Facebook to the cause of unhappiness, this new study casts a positive light on social media. Maybe it's not the devil in disguise after all, no matter how many divorces can be blamed for it.

I think in the end it comes down to moderation. If you find your life is consumed with social media and it's affecting you in a negative way then step away. Also, carefully consider what you choose to share on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. If your accounts aren't locked you're basically opening the doors to a world of critique and criticism from strangers, and we all know that that’s just asking for psychological damage right there.

Just learn to guard yourself, don't let others failures or successes affect you, and logout every once in awhile. You know, check yourself before you wreck yourself, and you'll be OK.


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