Rihanna Goes Rogue (And Nude) In Controversial New Ad

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England is so not having it, girl.

Is Rihanna's poster for her new perfume, Rogue, too sexy for children's eyes?

That depends on what it's relative to. Relative to her CFDA awards dress that was completely see-through? (Actually, it's kind of a tie there). 

However, Britain's Advertising Standards Agency disagrees. The organization has upheld part of a single complaint that claimed that the poster was "offensively sexual, demeaning to women and that featured images not suitable for children to see."

The agency issued the following statement, "While we did not consider the image to be overtly sexual, we considered that Rihanna's pose, with her legs raised in the air, was provocative. Because of this, and the fact that Rihanna appeared to be naked except for high heels, we concluded that the ad was sexually suggestive and should have been given a placement restriction to reduce the possibility of it being seen by children."

As such, the poster has been banned from areas where it is possible for children to see it.

RiRi is certainly not new to sexually provocative photography when it comes to her previous perfume campaigns, Nude and Rebelle. In 2012, when her first two perfumes were released, the singer/songwriter also released two posters that were equally if not more racy.

Rihanna was completely nude in her poster for Rebelle, which was displayed at Times Square. For Nude, she wore little more than a cream lace bra and some fabric draped across her body.

We wonder how RiRi is taking the news. Do you think she will put up a fight against the Advertising Standards Agency like she did with Instagram?

Check out the photo and tell us what you think: too much, or just enough?

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